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Part 2: ADF Cadets

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Chapter 1: ADF Cadets Governance

INTRODUCTION

1.1.1 Australian Defence Force Cadets (ADF Cadets) is the collective title for the three individual community based cadet organisations - the Australian Navy Cadets (ANC), the Australian Army Cadets (AAC) and the Australian Air Force Cadets (AAFC).

1.1.2 The ADF Cadets provide youth development programs conducted by the Services in cooperation with schools and the community. ADF Cadets benefits the Nation by developing a person and their capacity to contribute to their communities and wider society, fostering an interest in Defence Force careers and developing ongoing support for Defence. ADF Cadets is an inclusive organisation that provides opportunities for young people from a wide range of social backgrounds and abilities.

1.1.3 Governance refers to the processes by which an organisation is directed, controlled and held to account in order to achieve its strategic and operational objectives. It encompasses authority, stewardship, leadership, direction and control. Sound corporate governance practice requires integration of risk management principles and processes into strategic planning, reporting, performance measurement and day to day operations.

1.1.4 Effective ADF Cadets governance is key to ensuring Defence can meet its obligations to provide a safe environment and a positive cadet experience for young people participating in the ADF Cadets.

DEFINITIONS

1.1.5 The definitions used in Part 2 are listed in the Glossary.

POLICY INTENT

1.1.6 The policy provides the Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) with policy direction that supports effective management of the ADF Cadets.

POLICY

ONE CADET APPROACH

1.1.7 One Cadet was introduced as a transformation program to address issues identified by the 2015 Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. Similar to One Defence, One Cadet is an approach to bring coherence and clearly delineate accountabilities across the complex environment of ADF Cadets; specifically the area of Youth Protection.

1.1.8 One Cadet is not a command and control structure but complements existing single-Service command chains. Wherever appropriate, the ADF Cadets are to adopt common procedures, assurance, and education and training programs within the policy parameters established by the Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC). Its key features include:

a. establishing clear accountabilities for the management of Youth Protection in Defence, including the management of an effective Youth Protection governance and assurance framework
b. providing a strong strategic centre for Defence’s Youth Policy development
c. integrating key common enablers to optimise efficiencies in the administration and support of ADF Cadets
d. standardising policy, training and culture across the ADF Cadets where appropriate
e. embedding a strong culture of Youth Protection, safety and continuous improvement based on best practice within each of the single-Service Cadet programs.

ACCOUNTABILITIES, ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1.1.9 Accountabilities, roles and responsibilities are to be clearly defined across all levels of ADF Cadets and include performance expectations of key Defence personnel, ADF Cadets Adults and Youth and governance boards.

ACCOUNTABILITIES

1.1.10 The legal instruments that give effect to the ADF Cadets accountabilities include:

a. Defence Act 1903, Part 5 – ADF Cadets
b. Chief of Defence Force (CDF) (Administration of ADF Cadets) 2019
c. CJC – Approval of Payments to ADF Cadets 2020
d. Defence (Payment to ADF Cadets) Determination 2019.

1.1.11 Under section 62A(1) of the Defence Act 1903, CDF is to direct and administer the ADF Cadets.

1.1.12 Under section 62A(3) of the Defence Act 1903, CDF may direct the Vice Chief of the Defence Force or a Service Chief (or any other member of the Defence Force) to assist in the direction and administration of the ADF Cadets.

1.1.13 Under the CDF Directions and Authorisations (Administration of ADF Cadets) 2019, CDF has directed CJC to establish policy requirements that are to apply to the ADF Cadets.

1.1.14 Under the CDF Directions and Authorisations (Administration of ADF Cadets) 2019, the Service Chiefs are to administer their respective Cadet program within the policy parameters established by CJC.

1.1.15 Commander ADF Cadets (CADFC) is accountable to CJC for the development, implementation and application of centralised accountabilities for common policies, procedures, training and enabling functions of the ADF Cadets as well as the overarching youth safety system across the ADF Cadets.

1.1.16 Deputy Commander ADF Cadets (DCADFC) is accountable to CADFC for:

a. the development of common ADF Cadets policies and procedures
b. the ADF Cadets assurance regime
c. analysis of incident reporting across the three ADF Cadets organisations
d. the management of ADF Cadets communications elements comprising information and communication technologies (ICT), information/records management, liaison with the Chief Information Officer’s (CIO) Group, digitisation of records and public relations.

1.1.17 DGANCR – Lead Enabling Manager-Support (LEM-S) – is accountable to CADFC for liaison with Estate and Infrastructure Group (E&IG), legal support, incident reporting, commercial/contractual liaison and logistics management for common elements.

1.1.18 COMD AAC – Lead Enabling Manager–Training (LEM-T) – is accountable to CADFC for development and delivery of common training curricula for Officers and Instructors of Cadets and for delivery of common elements of cadets’ educational programs.

1.1.19 Each of the LEMs remain responsible to their Service Chiefs for Service-specific elements of the three individual programs that comprise the ADF Cadets as well as each of those operational aspects best managed along single-Service lines (for example, Work Health and Safety (WHS), financial management, incident management and unique cadets’ environmental development activities).

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

CHIEF OF DEFENCE FORCE

1.1.20 CDF is responsible for the administration of the ADF Cadets. In doing so, the CDF must comply with any relevant directions of the Minister.

CHIEF OF JOINT CAPABILITIES

1.1.21 CJC, as the delegate of CDF, provides the common policy, governance and accountability for the ADF Cadets and is responsible for:

a. providing common policy guidance to Service Chiefs for the administration of ADF Cadets
b. promulgating ADF Cadets common policies
c. overseeing the governance of the ADF Cadets for youth protection
d. providing advice to CDF on ADF Cadets matters.

SERVICE CHIEFS

1.1.22 Service Chiefs are responsible for:

a. ensuring that their respective cadet organisations comply with any relevant direction of the Minister, the CDF or the CJC
b. administering their respective cadet program in accordance with the applicable policies established by the CJC
c. ensuring that their cadet organisations’ procedures align with the ADF Cadets policies contained in Parts 1 and 2
d. resourcing the implementation of this policy, including the provision of ordinary recurrent funding, permanent and Reserve ADF staff, Australian Public Service staff and logistics support.

HEAD JOINT SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION / COMMANDER ADF CADETS

1.1.23 Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)/CADFC is responsible for:

a. commanding all staff assigned to the ADF Cadets Headquarters in delivering common elements of the ADF Cadets program
b. developing ADF Cadets policies in accordance with Defence’s policy process and conducting regular reviews of those policies
c. assure implementation of the Defence Youth Protection Management System
d. monitoring and reporting on the relevant aspects of governance of the ADF Cadets, including compliance with the policies contained in Part 1
e. allocating any special additional financial support that Government may wish to channel directly to the ADF Cadets
f. advising CJC on ADF Cadets matters.

DIRECTOR GENERAL AUSTRALIAN NAVY CADETS AND RESERVES, COMMANDER AUSTRALIAN ARMY CADETS AND DIRECTOR GENERAL CADETS - AIR FORCE/LEAD ENABLING MANAGERS (LEM)

1.1.24 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS - AF/LEM are responsible for:

a. Implementing the Defence Youth Safety Framework (DYSF) in cadet organisations
b. undertaking their duties as LEM in accordance with the ADF Cadets Headquarters One Cadet model and their respective Joint Directives from CJC and their Service Chiefs
c. complying with the policies contained in the YOUTHPOLMAN
d. ensuring that all relevant ADF Cadets procedures are consistent with policies in Parts 1 and 2
e. supporting preparation of the annual report on the administration of the ADF Cadets enterprise
f. ensuring that all ADF Cadets single-Service Headquarters and Directorates are aware of the policies in Parts 1 and 2 and their obligations under them
g. ensuring that Defence personnel who are engaged with external service providers for the provision of goods or services to ADF Cadets ensure that contracts include clauses that explicitly require compliance with all relevant ADF Cadets policies in Parts 1 and 2.

1.1.25 For Youth Protection Roles, Responsibilities and Accountabilities see Part 1 Chapter 1.

DEFENCE YOUTH SAFETY FRAMEWORK

1.1.26 Youth safety, including risk mitigation, is crucial to the safe and effective execution of all ADF Cadets programs. The DYSF provides definitive guidance with respect to achieving and maintaining youth safety across Defence.

1.1.27 The Commonwealth Child Safety Framework (CCSF) defines the minimum child safe requirements that all Commonwealth departments, including ADF Cadets, must comply with. Requirement 3 of the CCSF directs implementation of the National Principles for Child Safe Organisations. Collectively, these requirements and principles closely align to the elements of a safety management system. Hence, youth protection is managed within the Defence WHS Management System as a specialist Safety Domain owned by CJC.

1.1.28 The DYSF incorporates policy and procedural guidance, risk management strategies and a range of supporting tools and resources designed to ensure youth are safe, protected and respected and to ensure that ADF Cadets participants have the skills, confidence and knowledge to safeguard youth within the ADF Cadets programs. YOUTHPOLMAN Part 1 is the primary ADF reference for all matters relating to youth safety in the ADF context.

REPORTING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

1.1.29 In accordance with section 62D of the Defence Act 1903, CDF must prepare an annual report on the administration of the ADF Cadets.

1.1.30 HJSSD/CADFC, on behalf of CJC, is responsible for monitoring and reporting on all aspects of the One Cadet governance model including overarching assurance functions and compliance with the policies contained in YOUTHPOLMAN and the DYSF.

1.1.31 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are responsible for implementing, monitoring and reporting on all aspects of overarching assurance functions within their respective ADF Cadets organisations.

1.1.32 The ADF Cadets risk management and assurance systems include both internal and external controls that track and analyse incident data with a view to supporting a system of continuous improvement. Reporting and performance monitoring relating to One Cadet and Youth Protection accountabilities should be reported and reviewed within the ADF Cadets committee structure outlined below and in accordance with Part 1 Section 4 Chapter 1.

1.1.33 Joint Reserve and Cadet Policy Committee (JRCPC). The JRCPC is the senior forum responsible for administration of the ADF Reserves and Cadets policy and the ADF’s senior governance body for the application of the DYSF. The JRCPC meets twice each calendar year. DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF prepare reports for the standing agenda items relating to the Youth Protection Board and ADF Cadets governance.

1.1.34 Joint Cadet Executive Board (JCEB). The JCEB meets a minimum of twice each calendar year and is the senior governance forum in the ADF Cadets Headquarters. It coordinates the development and implementation of a comprehensive governance regime for all common elements of the ADF Cadets.

1.1.3 Joint Cadet Administration Board (JCAB). The JCAB meets a minimum of twice each calendar year and is the forum in the ADF Cadets Headquarters charged with the management of operational issues. It is responsible for overseeing the comprehensive assurance system of ADF Cadets and is the conduit for common issues to be elevated to the JCEB.

1.1.36 A diagrammatical representation of the ADF Cadets committee structure is at Annex A.

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

1.1.37 To meet the requirements for timely, effective and transparent administration and decision making, Defence and the ADF Cadets information management systems must combine all elements of best practice information management, including governance and security.

1.1.38 For further guidance, refer to the ICT policy at Section 4, Chapter 4.

IMPLEMENTATION

1.1.39 Each Service must ensure that appropriate arrangements and adequate resourcing are in place to enable the policies contained in Parts 1 and 2 to be implemented.

1.1.40 The policies contained in Parts 1 and 2 provide leading practice evidence-based direction on the day-to-day management of the ADF Cadets.

1.1.41 The ADF Cadets policies contained in Part 2 supersede all relevant current single-Service cadet policies on the matters to which they relate and in the event of any inconsistency, YOUTHPOLMAN policies prevail over single-Service cadet policies.

Annex

  1. ADF Cadets Committee Structure Diagram
Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 1: ADF Cadets Management of Youth Participation

INTRODUCTION

2.1.1 The effective management of youth in the ADF Cadets is critical to delivering a youth safe environment. The maintenance of accurate, up-to-date information on youth participants, such as health management plans and emergency contact details, is clearly related to good youth safety outcomes. Additionally, clear behavioural standards and expectations provides youth participants with an understanding of their responsibilities within the programs. The effective administration and management of youth participants underpins the Defence Youth Safety Framework (DYSF).

POLICY INTENT

2.1.2 This policy outlines the management and behavioural requirements for participating youth which are common to all ADF Cadets Programs.

2.1.3 Defence and the ADF Cadets fulfil their youth protection responsibilities by adhering to the requirements of the DYSF and the policies contained in the Youth Policy Manual (YOUTHPOLMAN).

PARTICIPATING IN ADF CADETS

2.1.4 Participating in ADF Cadets provides youth with opportunities to develop skills, leadership and teamwork and inculcate a sense of service to their communities. Qualified and experienced ADF Cadets Adults instruct cadets on the customs, traditions and values of their parent Service. ADF Cadets activities develop skills and behaviours that cultivate a socially responsible attitude to Defence and the Australian community. Participation in ADF Cadets and associated activities is voluntary and is not a prerequisite for acceptance into the ADF.

2.1.5 Defence supports the ADF Cadets in delivering coordinated, coherent and well governed youth activities that are safe, offer a positive experience for youth and are inclusive of all youth, regardless of gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation or ability. Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and the Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) are to manage restrictions limiting a cadet’s involvement in activities, such as religious beliefs, medical condition(s) or any other consideration(s) as notified by the cadet’s parent/guardian, in accordance with the policies contained in the YOUTHPOLMAN. DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must ensure that activities that require specific written parental or guardian consent are managed in accordance with the policies contained in the YOUTHPOLMAN.

Status of ADF Cadets Youths

2.1.6 All cadets in the ADF Cadets are volunteers as defined in the Defence Act 1903:

  1. Section 62, the Australian Navy/Army/Air Force Cadets consists of persons who have volunteered and been accepted by the Chief of the Defence Force as cadets
  2. Section 62C, ‘a cadet is not a member of the Defence Force’
  3. Section 62D, no civil contract of any kind is created with the Crown or the Commonwealth in connection with the acceptance of a person as a cadet in the Cadets.

2.1.7 Youth participation in ADF Cadets is voluntary. Youth participants are not members of the ADF and are not subject to the Defence Force Discipline Act 1982

2.1.8 ADF Cadets Youth participants are deemed to be workers under section 7 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act) and Defence is deemed to be the employing authority.

2.1.9 Cadets are, under certain conditions, eligible for rehabilitation, compensation and support under the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation (Defence-related Claims) Act 1988 (DRCA) or Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2004 (MRCA) (see Section 2, Chapter 6).

JOINING ADF CADETS 

2.1.10 The minimum age to apply as a cadet is 12, where the cadet would turn 13 in the calendar year in which they would be accepted. Registration is voluntary with each application processed in accordance with the applicable Service Cadet Program’s enrolment process. Cadets may withdraw their application at any time during the enrolment process, in accordance with respective Service Cadet Program’s processes.

2.1.11 DGANCR, COMD AAC, and DGCADETS-AF or their delegates may waive the age restrictions for individual cadets or specific groups within their respective programs. They may also apply more stringent age limits (for example, a narrower age bracket) to meet specific program requirements and/or outcomes.

2.1.12 A youth must only be a member of one cadet organisation at any time. A cadet whose participation is cancelled may apply to enrol in another ADF Cadets program. In this circumstance, the cadet must indicate in the new application the reason why their participation in the ADF Cadets had been cancelled. Enrolment decisions must be made by DGANCR, COMD AAC, the DGCADETS-AF or their delegates with the decision informed by reviewing the cadet’s:

a. application and the reasons they have ceased participation in their previous cadet organisation
b. record on CadetNet, including the cadet’s attendance and commitment to the previous cadet organisation.

2.1.13 DGANCR, COMD AAC or DG CADETS-AF may also apply additional or more stringent restrictions to the cadet’s participation (for example, training or supervision).

2.1.14 DGANCR, COMD AAC or DG CADETS-AF will provide all parents/guardians with information relating to the requirements of their child’s participation including the behavioural expectations of the participant and any family obligations to the respective ADF Cadets program.

2.1.15 Military-Like activities (MLA) are a distinguishing feature of the ADF Cadets program. DGANCR, COMD AAC or DG CADETS-AF must take reasonable steps to ensure that all prospective applicants and their parents/guardians are aware that MLA are conducted as part of the cadet program and that participation is voluntary.

2.1.16 DGANCR, COMD AAC or DG CADETS-AF are to ensure that on completion of the enrolment process, the young person receives a confirmation of approval of participation.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION

2.1.17 DGANCR, COMD AAC or DG CADETS-AF will ensure that individuals accepted into a Service Cadet Program are provided with a CadetNet logon identification and that members use the CadetNet system in accordance with the policies contained in the Section 4, Chapter 4.

2.1.18 DGANCR, COMD AAC or DG CADETS-AF will ensure that all members are aware of and adhere to the Use of Social Media in ADF Cadets policy (see Section 4, Chapter 5) and relevant Service Social Media policy.

YOUTH PROTECTION EDUCATION AND TRAINING

2.1.19 DGANCR, COMD AAC or DG CADETS-AF must ensure that all cadets under the age of 18 complete the mandatory Defence Youth Protection Level 6 - youth training package as follows:

a. Timeframe: no later than 60 days following the cadet’s receipt of their notification of approval of participation 
b. Delivery: training can be completed on-line or in a face to face training setting
c. Expiry: the training package must be completed every three years
d. Record of Completion: training completions are to be uploaded by the cadet’s unit into CadetNet within the 60 day timeframe.

2.1.20 ADF cadets aged 18 or over are to complete the mandatory Defence Youth Protection Level 6 – Youth Adult and Level 1 - Awareness training packages as follows:

a. Timeframe: prior to their 18th birthday
b. Delivery: training can be completed on-line or in a face to face training setting
c. Expiry: the training package must be completed as follows:

(1) Level 1 Awareness training – every three years
(2) Level 6 Youth (18 – 25) – every year

d. Record of Completion: Training completions are to be uploaded by the cadet’s unit into CadetNet by the cadet’s 18th birthday.

2.1.21 Compliance: All ADF Cadets Youth are required to complete the relevant Youth Protection training package within the required timeframe. A cadet may attend parade nights/other activities to enable completion of this training. In normal circumstances, a failure to complete this training will exclude a cadet from participation in ADF Cadets activities. By exception, DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF may make risk informed decisions to permit program participation where the training requirement is unable to be met as a result of the individual circumstances relating to the cadet. In consideration of an exemption from completion of youth safety training, DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF should consider all relevant factors to ensure the safety of the Program, which may include the safety of the individual involved, other youth they may interact with, any non-ADF Cadets Adults that may attend in a carer capacity or any other relevant matters to assess any associated risks to youth safety. An exemption may necessitate alternate risk mitigations to be put in place in the form of training, supervision or processes. Where an exception is made, it is to be reported to HJSSD to inform Defence’s youth safety understanding.

2.1.22 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF will establish appropriate procedures for the:

a. dropping cadets at cadet units
b. collecting cadets from cadet units 
c. action to be taken for uncollected cadets.

2.1.23 Defence and the ADF Cadets are committed to promoting the wellbeing of youth and protecting them from unacceptable behaviours with a focus on promoting youth safe behaviour. This will be achieved through:

a. supporting cadets to behave in a manner that is safe, inclusive and respectful of others and promotes the goals of the ADF Cadets program 
b. promoting appropriate cadet behaviour through positive and proactive role models and access to appropriate learning and development opportunities

c. ADF Cadets ensuring all youth protection complaints are taken seriously and effectively managed including listening to the youth, responding appropriately/sensitively to the needs of the youth and acting on the information in accordance with relevant YOUTHPOLMAN policies.

2.1.24 When participating in ADF Cadets activities, all cadets are encouraged to develop an understanding of the balance between personal freedoms and choices and the responsibilities associated with being a member of the ADF Cadets.

2.1.25 ADF Cadets encourages all members to feel confident to speak up against, and report incidents of unacceptable behaviour.

2.1.26 The ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth) is a component of the organisation’s approach to youth safety. It describes the behaviour standards to be observed and demonstrated by all cadets. DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF are to ensure that all cadets:

  1. Understand, sign and adhere to the ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth) and that the signed document is recorded on CadetNet
  2. are made aware that the standards of behaviour set out in the ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth) apply during ADF Cadets ‘contact’ hours and whenever a cadet’s behaviour has the potential to impact on their ADF Cadets Program or the broader Defence organisation. This includes, but may not be limited to social functions involving fellow ADF Cadets participants and social media activities.

2.1.27 Behaviour exhibited by cadets is to be consistent with the behavioural requirements stipulated in the ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth), YOUTHPOLMAN policies and relevant ADF Cadets organisation procedures. Failure to comply with these policies and procedures may result in:

  1. a report being made to the cadets parent/guardians
  2. participants being withdrawn from involvement in activities
  3. cancellation of the cadet’s acceptance in the ADF Cadets program
  4. a report to the police and/or the relevant state or territory child and youth protection authority.

2.1.28 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure that all activities are to be led by trained OOC and/or IOC.

All adults working with cadets are acting in a position of trust and cadets are likely to view these adults as role models. As such they have a responsibility to behave:

  1. with the best interests of cadets in mind at all times
  2. with integrity – acting honestly, respectfully and courteously at all times and not allowing mateship and/or familiarity to be misused to cover up unacceptable behaviour or bring the organisation into disrepute
  3. in a way that encourages young people and adults to feel comfortable enough to point out attitudes or behaviours considered unacceptable and/or unsafe.

2.1.30 The ADF Cadets will ensure that interactions and relationships between adults and youth are managed in a manner consistent with the requirements of the DYSF and the policies contained in the YOUTHPOLMAN.

2.1.31 Unacceptable behaviour in the youth protection context is behaviour that, having regard to all of the circumstances, would be considered unlawful, offensive, belittling, abusive or threatening to youth and/or adverse to their morale, health, safety and wellbeing or otherwise not in the interests of Defence. Unacceptable behaviour has the potential to adversely affect individuals, team morale, discipline and/or cohesion.

2.1.32 Unacceptable behaviour is not tolerated by Defence or the ADF Cadets. Unacceptable behaviour is considered a breach of the ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth) and will be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3.

2.1.33 Incidents of unacceptable behaviour will be addressed by the supervising Unit Commander, IOC/OOC and may be reported to the relevant ADF Cadets organisation

Management of Unacceptable Behavior

2.1.34 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must ensure all unacceptable behaviour is reported and managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3.

2.1.35 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to inform all participants of the policy and process for reporting all unacceptable behaviour.

2.1.36 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to provide parents and guardians with information about complaint handling and resolution. This will equip parents/guardians to act as effective advocates for the cadet, who may prefer that an adult makes a complaint on their behalf.

2.1.37 All reports of unacceptable behaviour made by young people or their parents/guardians are to be taken seriously and managed fairly, transparently and equitably in accordance with policy contained in Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3.

2.1.38 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must ensure that all Defence, Cadets Adults and cadets (including cadets over the age of 18) are aware of their responsibility to report any disclosures or concerns of harm relating to any young person in accordance with the Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3.

2.1.39 Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3 Annex D provides information and contact details regarding the types of support and counselling services available to cadets including the Sexual Misconduct Prevention Response Office (SeMPRO) or the Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

Ceasing participation in the ADF Cadets

2.1.40 Ceasing participation in the ADF Cadets can be requested by the cadet or by the respective Service Cadet Program cancelling the cadet’s acceptance.

2.1.41 Cadets may request cancellation of participation in the ADF Cadets at any time, in accordance with respective Service Cadet Program processes, but a cadet is required to cease participation as a cadet no later than 31 December in the calendar year that they turn 18. The ANC, AAC and AAFC have specific arrangements in place for cadets transitioning into other roles within their cadet organisations.

2.1.42 Cancellation of participation can be initiated by a cadet organisation if a cadet:

  1. poses an immediate risk to the safety and wellbeing of another perso
  2. fails to display behaviours in accordance with this policy or breaches the ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth) or the respective cadet organisation parent Service values
  3. fails to complete youth protection training requirements
  4. displays unacceptable behaviour in accordance with Part 1 Section 2 Chapter 2
  5. displays a lack of commitment to the program or is consistently absent without notification
  6. misrepresents Defence or the ADF Cadets
  7. fails to comply with any reasonable direction given by an IOC or OOC.

2.1.43 Cancellation decisions must be made by DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF or a designated delegate. While there is no legal or policy obligation to provide procedural fairness, it is important to manage the process of ceasing participation well. Prior to a cadet’s participation being cancelled and where appropriate and reasonably practicable, the cadet will be afforded a level of procedural fairness commensurate with their volunteer status. Procedural fairness is characterised as - a decision-maker should not be biased, that the person who is adversely affected by a decision should not be surprised by the decision or by the information that the decision-maker has relied on, and that they have an opportunity to be heard in relation to the matter before the decision is made.

2.1.44 On cessation of participation in the ADF Cadets, the cadet must return their Defence issued identity card, uniform and/or any other property/equipment owned by Defence or the ADF Cadets on or before the last day of their participation.

Privacy

2.1.45 While conducting its activities and programs ADF cadets gathers and retains personal information about its members and participants. Sharing of youth personal and sensitive information relevant to this policy is to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Related International Agreements

United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child

Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

 

Chapter 2: Management of ADF Cadets Adults

INTRODUCTION

2.2.1 The success of the ADF Cadets relies on attracting adults with the appropriate attitude, skill sets, experiences and aptitude for engaging in military-like, youth development opportunities. Well motivated and trained adult volunteers are essential for delivering programs that meet the needs of the participants, their parents or guardians and the ADF. The effective management of ADF Cadets Adults comprising Defence Approved Helpers (DAH), Instructors of Cadets (IOC) and Officers of Cadets (OOC), is essential.

POLICY INTENT

2.2.2 The intent of this policy is to provide guidance for the management of ADF Cadets Adults.

2.2.3 Cadets enrolled in a cadet program at the time of turning 18 remain youth participants, managed in accordance with the Management of ADF Cadets Youth policy (see Section 2, Chapter 1).

POLICY

Registration

2.2.4 ADF Cadets Adults is the term used when describing IOC, OOC and DAH.

2.2.5 IOC and OOC are volunteers who are accepted and trained by Defence to conduct cadet activities. Service requirements determine the availability of IOC and OOC positions.

2.2.6 DAH have a different status to IOC and OOC and are not eligible to claim Cadet Volunteer Pay (CVP).

2.2.7 IOC and OOC are responsible and accountable for the overall welfare, supervision and safety of a cadet or group of cadets during cadet activities. DAH are unpaid volunteers who provide essential capacity to ADF Cadets through supporting IOC and OOC in the conduct of cadet activities. Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) must ensure DAH meet registration requirements prior to acceptance and are appropriately trained for the level of supervisory responsibility allocated to them within the respective cadet organisations.

2.2.8 ADF Cadets Adults are only accepted for participation in the ADF Cadets programs once the registration requirements have been met. Registration requirements differ between ANC, AAC and AAFC and may also be dependent on the proposed role of the applicant. A significant component of the registration process is the screening of applicants to ensure they are suitable for working with youth. The minimum requirements for participation as an ADF Cadets Adult are:

a. National Police Check
b. maintenance of relevant State/Territory working with children check (WWCC)
c. acceptance of and adherence with the Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct (Adult)
d. IOC and OOC must accept an Instrument of Acceptance
e. completion of mandatory youth protection training
f. a review of the applicant’s military conduct record (if the applicant is currently serving or has served previously in the Australian Defence Force).

2.2.9 The minimum age for DAH, IOC and OOC is 18.

Status of ADF Cadets Adults

2.2.10 All IOC, OOC and cadets of the ADF Cadets are volunteers as defined in the Defence Act 1903:

  1. Section 62, the Australian Navy/Army/Air Force Cadets consists of persons who have volunteered and been accepted by the Chief of the Defence Force as officers, instructors or cadets.
  2. Section 62C, ‘a cadet is not a member of the Defence Force’ and ‘a person with a role of administering, managing, supervising or training cadets does not become a member of the Defence Force because of that role’.
  3. Section 62D, no civil contract of any kind is created with the Crown or the Commonwealth in connection with the acceptance of a person as an officer, instructor or cadet in the Cadets.

2.2.11 ADF Cadets Adults are volunteers, as such, they are not members of the ADF and are not subject to the Defence Force Discipline Act.

2.2.12 DAH, IOC and OOC, as volunteers, are deemed to be workers under Section 7 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act), and Defence is deemed to be the employing authority.

2.2.13 IOC and OOC are, under certain conditions, eligible for rehabilitation, compensation and support under the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation (Defence-related Claims) Act 1988 (DRCA) or Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2004 (MRCA). DAH are not eligible for compensation for injury, disease or death relating to cadet activities via DRCA or MRCA but may be covered for compensation by the Department of Defence’s insurance arrangement with Comcover (Section 2 Chapter 6 refers).

Working with children checks

2.2.14 ADF Cadets Adults are considered to be in youth-related work positions according to the definition of obtaining a Working with Children Check (WWCC). When applying for WWCC, ADF Cadets Adults should identify themselves as volunteers on the application form.

2.2.15 ADF Cadets Adults are to obtain WWCC for the States and/or Territories relevant to their youth-related work in accordance with each relevant jurisdiction’s requirements before they undertake ANY youth-related work in that State or Territory. WWCC are to be maintained while ADF Cadets Adults remain in a youth-related work position.

2.2.16 ADF Cadets Adults are to advise their respective ADF Cadet organisation headquarters of any event or issue that impacts or could impact their WWCC

ADF Cadets Adults Youth Safe Behavior

2.2.17 ADF Cadets adhere to the requirements of the Defence Youth Safety Framework.

2.2.18 Unacceptable behaviour in the youth protection context is behaviour that, having regard to all of the circumstances, would be considered unlawful, offensive, belittling, abusive or threatening to youth and/or adverse to their morale, health, safety and wellbeing or otherwise not in the interests of Defence (see Part 1 Section 2 Chapter 2).

2.2.19 ADF Cadets Adults are required to understand their responsibilities in ensuring ADF Cadets programs are safe and free from unacceptable behaviour.

2.2.20 ADF Cadets Adults must ensure compliance with the special care provision which prohibits any person in a supervisory or support role from engaging sexually with a person who is considered a youth, irrespective of the legal age of consent (see Part 1 Section 6 Chapter 1).

2.2.21 To ensure appropriate management in the ADF Cadets context, any pre-existing personal relationships, such as a family relationship, close friendship, sexual relationship (where a youth is over the age of consent for the State or Territory but is not in a Defence context) must be declared to the respective chain of command (see Part 1 Section 6 Chapter 1).

2.2.22 An ADF Cadets Adult who suspects, on reasonable grounds, that a child or young person is at risk of being abused and/or neglected, must report their suspicion to the appropriate reporting authority in their State or Territory and through their chain of command.

2.2.23 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must ensure that all ADF Cadets Adults are aware of their responsibilities to report, internally through the chain of command and externally to youth protection agencies or police. Reporting must be managed in accordance with the Youth Protection Complaint and Event/Incident Management policy (see Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3).

2.2.24 ADF Cadets Adults responding to allegations of a sexual misconduct or child abuse between an adult and a youth are to ensure the youth is made aware they are entirely without blame.

2.2.25 There may be situations not covered by this policy or that require an ADF Cadets Adult to act outside this policy to keep a young person safe. Should such a situation arise, adults must advise their respective chain of command as soon as practicable of any action already taken or proposed.

Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct (Adult)

2.2.26 Defence is committed to ensuring the health, protection and wellbeing of all youth who engage with Defence. Clear definition, acceptance and adherence to the expected standard of conduct/behaviour by adults and youth is required to ensure a youth safe environment, where youth are protected from harm and which delivers a positive experience.

2.2.27 The Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct (see Part 1 Section 2 Chapter 2) defines the minimum ethical, acceptable and unacceptable youth safe behaviours and provides a mechanism to acknowledge the responsibility and record the commitment of ADF Cadets Adults to adhere to the Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct. Doing so enables Defence to hold a person to account if they breach the code of conduct.

2.2.28 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must ensure that a signed copy of the latest version of the Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct (Adults) is stored in CadetNet, for all ADF Cadets Adults.

2.2.29 Any breach of the Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct (Adults) is managed in accordance with the Youth Protection Complaint and Event/Incident Management policy (see Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3).

Defence Youth Safety Training

2.2.30 DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must ensure that all adult participants complete the mandatory Defence Youth Safety Training Level 1-3 package as follows:

2.2.31 Level One – Awareness. Requirements

  1. Audience: all adult participants (including cadets over the age of 18)
  2. Timeframe: no later than 60 days following the adult’s receipt of their notification of approval of participation
  3. Delivery: training can be completed on-line or in a face to face training setting
  4. Expiry: training package must be completed every three years
  5. Record of Completion: training completions are to be uploaded into CadetNet within the 60 day timeframe.

2.2.32 Level Two – Practitioner. Requirements

  1. Audience: OOC, IOC and DAH
  2. Timeframe: no later than 60 days following the adult’s receipt of their notification of approval of participation
  3. Delivery: training can be completed on-line or in a face to face training setting
  4. Expiry: training package must be completed every three years
  5. Record of Completion: training completions are to be uploaded into CadetNet.

2.2.33 Level Three – Leader. Requirements

  1. Audience: OOC
  2. Timeframe: no later than 60 days following the adult’s receipt of their Instrument of Acceptance
  3. Delivery: training can be completed on-line or in a face to face training setting
  4. Expiry: training package must be completed every three years
  5. Record of Completion: raining completions are to be uploaded into CadetNet.

2.2.34 Compliance: Adult participants are required to complete the relevant Youth Safety training package within the required timeframe. Adult participants in the Cadet programs may attend parade nights/other activities to enable completion of this training. Failure to complete this training will routinely exclude an adult participant from participation in ADF Cadets activities.2.

Cessation of Arrangements with ADF Cadets Adults

2.2.35 The volunteer nature of the arrangement between the ADF Cadets and a DAH, IOC and OOC means that the arrangement can end at any time, and initiated by either party.

2.2.36 Where possible, notice of the end of the arrangement should be given in writing and in enough time to ensure the cadet unit and cadets are not impacted.

2.2.37 While there is no legal or policy obligation to provide procedural fairness, it is important to manage the process of ending a volunteer arrangement well. Prior to a volunteer’s acceptance being cancelled and, where appropriate and reasonably practicable, the volunteer will be afforded a level of procedural fairness commensurate with their volunteer status. Procedural fairness is characterised as - a decision-maker should not be biased, that a person who is adversely affected by a decision should not be surprised by the decision or by the information that the decision-maker has relied on, and that they have an opportunity to be heard in relation to the matter before the decision is made.

2.2.38 Individuals who are deemed unsuitable to remain in the ADF Cadets and have their arrangement with a Service cadet program ceased, may be prevented from volunteering in another ADF Cadets organisation.

Privacy

2.2.39 Privacy matters relevant to this policy are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 3: ADF Cadets Protection Orders

INTRODUCTION

Protection Orders (PO) are orders made by a Federal, State or Territory court, or Police Service, for the protection of a person who may have experienced violence or threats of violence against them by another person. A PO can include domestic violence orders, apprehended violence orders, restraining orders, prohibition orders, firearms orders, weapons protection orders, or similar orders, and are designed to place limits or restrictions on a person’s behaviour towards the aggrieved person. A PO can also be used to protect children, relatives, friends or colleagues if there has been violence or threats of violence towards them.

An Interim Protection Order (IPO) is a temporary order that can be initiated and enforced while a complainant goes through the court process to get a final (longer term) order imposed. The initiation of an IPO does not guarantee that a PO will be imposed when the matter is eventually considered by a court.

Where an ADF Cadets Adult is the subject of an IPO or a PO, compliance with the restrictions imposed by the order may impede their ability to participate in ADF Cadets activities. It may also have implications for the safety and well-being of other cadet participants. Depending on the nature of the IPO/PO, an immediate decision may be required regarding their participation in future cadet activities to ensure the safety of other participants of ADF Cadets and the wider community.

POLICY INTENT

The purpose of this policy is to outline the responsibilities of ADF Cadets participants who are identified as respondents or aggrieved persons when an IPO is initiated or a PO is imposed. It also provides direction to the chain of command and higher level commands, on the actions to be taken if an ADF Cadets Adult becomes the subject of an IPO/PO.

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

ADF Cadets Adults as a respondent

Where an ADF Cadets Adult is identified as a respondent of an IPO/PO, they must report the matter to their chain of command in writing at the earliest opportunity and before attending their next cadet activity. The advice to the chain of command must include:

  1. a copy of the IPO/PO
  2. details of the circumstances which prompted the imposition of the IPO/PO
  3. details of the duration and conditions of the IPO/PO (if this information is not included in the order).

An ADF Cadets Adult who is the respondent of an IPO/PO must also notify their chain of command of any updated circumstances or changes to the order as soon as possible (for example, if the order has been amended or revoked).

A failure to comply with this policy may constitute grounds for the Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), or the Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) or their delegates, to consider commencing administrative action against the ADF Cadets Adult.

ADF Cadets Participants as a an aggrieved person

Where a participant is identified as the aggrieved person under an IPO/PO, and the order is likely to directly or indirectly affect their participation in cadet activities, the chain of command should be notified as soon as possible to ensure that appropriate support can be provided where necessary.

Chain of Command Responsibilities

Once notified that an IPO has been initiated or a PO has been imposed on an ADF Cadets Adult, their chain of command must conduct a risk assessment as soon as possible to ensure that the respondent’s participation in cadet activities does not place other ADF Cadet participants (both adults and youth) in an unsafe or vulnerable situation, or contribute to a contravention of the restrictions placed on the respondent by the order.

If the IPO/PO limits or restrains an ADF Cadets Adult's access to weapons, or cancels, suspends or refuses the issue of a firearms licence, permit or registration, the relevant chain of command must prevent the respondent’s access to firearms or weapons which are within ADF or ADF Cadets’ control.

A copy of the risk assessment, including details of the original notification of the IPO/PO, must be provided to DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF, or their delegates for consideration as the appropriate decision maker, noting that administrative action may be required regarding their continued participation in cadet activities.

Where an ADF Cadets participant is identified as the aggrieved person under an IPO/PO, the relevant chain of command should take steps to ensure that appropriate support is provided to enable their continued participation in cadet activities where possible.

Directors-General/Comd or their delegates

Upon receiving a risk assessment in relation to an IPO/ PO from the chain of command, DGANCR, COMD AAC, DGCADETS-AF, or their delegates should:

  1. consider whether the actions of the ADF Cadets Adult, leading to the issue of the IPO/PO, constitutes unacceptable behaviour in accordance with ADF Cadets Code of Conduct and if so, consider commencing administrative action including determining the respondent's current and ongoing suitability for duties with the ADF Cadets
  2. consider whether the actions leading to the issue of the IPO/PO require reporting in accordance with Defence Incident Reporting and Management Manual (IRMMAN).

DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF, or their delegates are to remain cognisant that an IPO/PO is a serious matter and their responses are critical to enhancing personnel safety and security. They also need to bear in mind that the allegation(s) that are the subject of an IPO may not have been tested in a court of law.

Procedural Fairness

While there is no legal or policy obligation to provide procedural fairness, ADF Cadets Adults who are the subject of an IPO/ PO will be afforded procedural fairness commensurate with their volunteer status where appropriate and reasonably practicable, when an administrative sanction is being considered against them.  Procedural fairness is characterised as:

A decision-maker should not be biased and that person who is adversely affected by a decision should not be surprised by the decision, or by the information that the decision-maker has relied on, and that they have an opportunity to be heard in relation to the matter before the decision is made.

Recording of Protection Orders

Details of all IPO/PO and associated risk assessments are to be recorded on the Defence Records Management System (Objective) by DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF, or their delegates, including the duration and cessation date of the order, as well as details concerning access to or possession of weapons. While the IPO/PO is in force, ADF Cadets are to ensure that any amendments to the order are entered in Objective. When the order ceases, ADF Cadets are to close the case in Objective.

ADF Cadets Adults who are also ADF members will have any IPO/PO recorded in Defence One/PMKeyS in accordance with Part 9 Chapter 4 of the Military Personnel Policy Manual (MILPERSMAN).

Privacy

All information in relation to IPO/PO should be marked “OFFICIAL Sensitive Personal”. Privacy matters relevant to this policy are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

 

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 4: ADF Cadets Youth Protection and Safety

INTRODUCTION

Defence is committed to ensuring the health, protection and wellbeing of all youth who engage with Defence. Youth Protection and Safety plays an important role in creating a youth safe culture and an environment where people identify, consider and address risks to youth before and as they arise.

Defence's highest priority within the ADF Cadets program is the safety of youth; to ensure youth are safe from physical dangers, protected from abuse and feel respected.

Defence's Youth Protection and Safety policy is detailed in Part 1.

POLICY INTENT

The intent of this policy is to provide specific guidance to ensure Service Cadet programs manage youth protection and youth safety in a manner consistent with the overarching youth safety principles and commitments articulated in the Defence Youth Safety Framework (DYSF), as defined in Part 1.

POLICY

Youth Protection Roles, Responsibilities and Accountabilities

The youth protection requirements of the Commonwealth Child Safe Framework (CCSF) align closely with the elements of a safety management system. Hence, youth protection is managed as a specialist Safety Domain within the Defence Work Health and Safety Management System (WHSMS).

Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC) is responsible for the governance and assurance of the DYSF, which is a fusion of youth protection and youth safety:

  1. Youth Protection. Encompasses matters related to protecting all youth from child abuse, managing the risk of child abuse, providing support to a youth at risk of child abuse and responding to incidents or allegations of child abuse.
  2. Youth Safety. Encompasses matters related to the physical safety of youth and adult volunteers when participating in ADF Cadets activities. This is managed through the application of the Defence Work Health and Safety (WHS) Framework, which is managed within Service WHS Systems and other Defence safety domains.

CJC is appointed the Accountable Officer and is the Safety Domain Owner for youth protection. CJC is accountable to the Secretary and Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) for:

  1. providing enterprise-level youth protection policy, guidance and tools for implementation within Group/Service WHSMS
  2. ensuring, in conjunction with Group Heads and Service Chiefs, that adequate resources are provided for effective youth protection management
  3. providing youth protection governance and assurance that ensures Defence meets youth protection obligations.

Service Chiefs are accountable to the Secretary and CDF (through CJC) for:

  1. extending application of the Service WHSMS and incident management systems, where practicable, to include youth protection management
  2. ensuring, in conjunction with CJC, that adequate resources are provided for effective youth protection management.

Service commanders, managers and supervisors must:

  1. effectively manage youth protection in accordance with policy and guidance defined in Part 1 and relevant Service youth protection policies and directions
  2. ensure that ADF Cadets Adults and Youth are aware of their youth protection responsibilities, understand how to report an incident and comply with youth protection policies and directions

Youth Safety Roles, Responsibilities and Accountabilities

The Service Chiefs are appointed as the ‘Officer’ under the WHS Act (2011) for their respective cadet programs.

While ADF Cadets Adults and cadets are not employees of the Department of Defence, for the purpose of the WHS Act (2011) they are administered as workers in accordance with Section 7.

Service Cadet programs must implement management systems which are compliant with Commonwealth legislation and relevant Service WHS Systems.

Service commanders, managers and supervisors must:

  1. effectively manage youth related WHS in accordance with policy and guidance defined in Service WHS orders, instructions and publications
  2. ensure that ADF Cadets Adults and Youth are aware of their WHS responsibilities and comply with policy and direction.

The Defence Youth Safety Framework - a holistic approach to Youth Protection and Youth Safety

The DYSF is broader than a pure safety framework. It includes youth specific components, which are designed to ensure young people are safe, protected and respected and to ensure ADF Cadets Adults have the skills, confidence and knowledge to safe guard youth within Defence.

Youth protection and youth safety are both managed within a safety management system and, as such, share common features and responsibilities. Service Cadet programs are responsible for the implementation of youth protection and youth safety systems that:

  1. Prioritise and promote youth protection and safety risk management appropriate to the ADF Cadets; i.e. that consider the age, maturity, understanding, behaviour and ability of cadets to make good decisions.
  2. Promote a youth safe culture. Inculcate a youth protection and safety culture that ensures all adults involved in ADF Cadets activities demonstrate their commitment to youth protection and safety through their agreement to undertake their responsibilities in accordance with the Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct (Adult).
  3. Ensure the suitability of all adults for engagement with youth. All adults involved in ADF Cadets activities, including Defence Approved Helpers (DAH), complete the mandated screening actions in accordance with Section 2 Chapter 2 Management of ADF Cadets Adults, prior to their acceptance as a volunteer.
  4. Provide appropriate training. Ensure all ADF Cadets Adults and Youth complete youth safety training appropriate to their role and responsibilities.
  5. Seek wide engagement. Encourage proactive engagement with parents, guardians and other responsible third parties involved in the protection of young people.
  6. Promote shared ownership. Ensure the involvement of cadets, parents and adult volunteers in creating and maintaining a youth safe environment.
  7. Promote a healthy reporting culture. Ensure ADF Cadets Adults and Youth including DAH, Defence personnel, families and the wider community know what to do if they have concerns about youth protection and safety in the ADF Cadets context and are aware of the process for reporting ADF Cadets youth protection and safety events/incidents.
  8. Plan and deliver activities that are safe for youth.
  9. Seek continuous improvement. Ensure the effective reporting, investigation and management of all breaches of the policies, relevant codes of conduct, youth protection and safety events/incidents in accordance with Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 to ensure the timely and accurate capture of data to inform continuous improvement.

Risk Management

Defence has a duty of care to ensure the health, protection and wellbeing of youth. Hazards and risks to the health, protection and wellbeing of youth are to be eliminated or minimised so far as reasonably practicable (SFARP).

The purpose of youth protection and youth safety risk management is to identify potential risks to youth health, protection and wellbeing and to implement action to minimise those risks. In assessing risks to youth, consideration must be given to the expectations of volunteers and the developmental stage(s) and behavioural nature of cadets. Specific hazards to be considered include the risks associated with the protection of youth from the unacceptable behaviour of adults and other youth.

Context-specific Risk Management. Commanders, managers and supervisors must ensure that all youth protection and WHS risks, specific to the context in which youth are engaged, are identified and managed in accordance with CJC’s Youth Protection Domain and Service WHSMS risk management policies, applying the following direction:

  1. Annual Risk Assessment. Youth protection and youth safety risk assessments must be undertaken and reviewed annually to assess all context-specific youth protection and youth safety risks.
  2. Task/Activity Risk Assessment. Risks to youth protection and safety must be considered and effectively managed as part of any deliberate and/or immediate risk assessment for a task/activity.
  3. Risk Control Implementation and Maintenance. All reasonably practicable youth protection and WHS risk controls must be documented in orders, instructions and publications as appropriate, implemented and effectively maintained (refer Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2).
  4. Risk Control Awareness. All personnel, including youth, must be made aware of youth protection risk controls (refer Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 1).
  5. Risk Registers. Joint Support Services Division (JSSD) will monitor, analyse and report on matters relating to youth protection and safety at an enterprise level. Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), and the Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) are to ensure all Service program specific youth protection and safety hazards, risks and issues are included in the Service program level WHS hazard, risk or issues registers, which should be reviewed annually.

Joint Cadet Activities. A lead Cadet Service, as agreed between DGANCR, COMD AAC or DG CADETS AF, has responsibility for the development of the activity risk management plans and conduct of a Joint Cadet Activity. Each Cadet Service participating in the activity is to countersign the plans. The lead Cadet Service requirements will take precedence where there is an inconsistency in requirements. Other Cadet Services attending a Joint Cadet Activity can produce their own specific risk management plan to supplement the management of their Service specific cadets, but such plans are not to lessen the value of the risk management plans of the nominated lead Cadet Service.

Youth Protection Event/Incident work health and Safety investigation

Thorough event/incident investigation and subsequent review and monitoring assist in improving safety through identifying new risks and enabling improvements to eliminate or minimise the recurrence of the event. Youth protection event/incident and WHS investigations are to be conducted in accordance with Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 4 and relevant Defence and/or Group/Service WHS and incident management policy.

Privacy

Privacy matters relevant to this policy are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

 

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 5: ADF Cadets Health and First Aid

INTRODUCTION

The Australian Defence Force (ADF) Cadets programs - Australian Navy Cadets (ANC); Australian Army Cadets (AAC) and the Australian Air Force Cadets (AAFC) are inclusive programs embracing of diversity. The success of the inclusive nature of the ADF Cadets is dependent on the proactive management of participant physical and mental health and provision of first aid. First aid is defined as immediate help given to a sick or injured person until full medical treatment is available.

POLICY INTENT

The intent of this policy is to provide guidance for the administration of participant physical and mental health, including fitness for participation and management of health conditions and the provision and maintenance of, equipment and training, for first aid.

POLICY

Health suitability for participation

Under the Work Health Safety (WHS) Act 2011, workers[1] must take reasonable care of their own health and safety and ensure that their actions or omissions do not adversely affect the health and safety of others. Maximising the inclusivity of ADF Cadets requires an approach that balances an understanding of individual health needs with WHS responsibilities (refer Section 2 Chapter 6).

Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), and the Director General Cadets – Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) are responsible for ensuring:

  1. ADF Cadets Adults and Youth have the appropriate level of health required to enable them to undertake the responsibilities of their role without putting either themselves or other people at risk
  2. the registration process requires a declaration of any health conditions that may impact on a person’s ability to participate (participants are only accepted if ADF Cadets can facilitate their involvement safely and without detriment to the other participants)
  3. adjustments are made as far as reasonably practicable, to provide a level of inclusiveness for individuals with health needs (evidence of this agreement must be documented on an Individual Health Management Plan (IHMP))
  4. individuals, seen as a potential risk to the safe environment of ADF Cadets, undergo a medical clearance, as a condition of participation (Annex A – Health Clearance Exemplar form, provides the basis for requests for medical clearance).

Management of health conditions

ADF Cadets must facilitate the notification of health conditions through enrolment and management documentation. Implementing reasonably practicable adjustments to accommodate the health conditions of participants involves working in partnership with the participant (and, for cadets, their parents/guardians) to ensure their health needs are identified and support strategies planned. ADF Cadets use IHMPs to outline and make a formal record of the agreed health management actions.

An IHMP should be created in conjunction with a participant’s medical practitioner/family. The plan must clearly:

  1. identify the individual’s name (a photo, if available)
  2. outline the individual’s diagnosis/condition
  3. explain the potential impact of the condition on the individual’s ability to fully participate in ADF Cadets and provide relevant important information to assist in managing the condition
  4. clarify expectations and responsibilities for all involved in the management of the health condition while participating in ADF Cadets
  5. outline the first aid response (if appropriate)
  6. outline treatment
  7. specify what medication is required, how to give it and where it is located
  8. provide a detailed list of emergency contact numbers.

An IHMP must list all actions and requirements for the management of any health conditions. DGANCR, COMD AAC, and DGCADETS-AF, or their delegates, may have to cancel the participation of an individual if they cannot safely manage the IHMP requirements.

DGANCR, COMD AAC, and DGCADETS-AF require IHMPs to be updated by participants when any health conditions change or when a new health condition arises. These changes will require a reassessment of the participant’s suitability for ongoing participation in ADF Cadets. Version control practices are to be implemented to ensure the current IHMP is available for the management of the health conditions.

ADF Cadets Adults are to ensure IHMPs are checked and considered when developing cadet activities and assessing WHS requirements. Some activities within the ADF Cadets may require participants to demonstrate a suitable level of health to participate, including those with an existing IHMP. Participants may be required to provide a medical clearance as per Annex A – Health Clearance Exemplar form.

IHMPs must be stored on CadetNet with a hard copy provided to all supervisors and supporting people in situations where CadetNet is not available.

When completing Activity Risk Assessments consideration must be given to the impact participants’ health conditions may have on the activity. Considerations may include:

  1. the location of the activity and its potential impact on emergency service response times
  2. the numbers and ratios of ADF Cadets Adults and young people for the particular activity
  3. the numbers and types of visitors, such as parents
  4. the level of risk the activity presents and the remoteness of the location
  5. the potential impact of the physical layout of the activity/facility and whether this may impact upon the safe running of the activity and/or ability to obtain medical assistance if required.

Allergens. ADF Cadets are to take precautions to mitigate the risk and consequences of exposure to food and other allergens. Where ADF Cadets Officers of Cadets (OOC) or Instructors of Cadets (IOC) have been notified that a participant has an allergy, clearly articulated and effective procedures are to be implemented, via an IHMP, to mitigate the risk to the individual. These should include the appropriate management of foodstuffs.

A warning must be included in joining instructions for cadet activities. The following statement is to be promulgated to all ADF Cadets participants and their parents/guardians:

“The Australian Defence Force (ADF) is unable to provide a severe food allergy free environment (such as from peanuts) in relation to the consumption of food during cadet activities. Such a risk may be life threatening for people who suffer from a severe food allergy. Parents may consider it is in their child’s best interest not to allow participation of their child in the proposed activity. In the event that the child is allowed to attend a catered cadet activity, the parents may choose to provide, at their own expense, sufficient food to cover the duration of the activity.”[2]

Defence policy prohibits cadets, parents and volunteers from being issued with and consuming ADF Combat Ration Packs (CRP) under any circumstances.

Contagious conditions. In the event that a participant in an ADF Cadets activity is found to have a contagious condition, or is suspected of having one, action must be taken in accordance with the relevant State or Territory health department guidelines and directions from the Public Health Medical Officer (PHMO) at the Public Health Unit: health.gov.au

Although supported wherever practicable by the ADF Cadets, individual participants are responsible for the correct management of their medical equipment, medication and other health related consumables.

ADF Cadets must maintain records relating to participants health conditions as follows:

  1. IHMPs
  2. changes to IHMPs
  3. the administration of medication
  4. emergency health actions
  5. any other related documentation

Provisions of First Aid

First Aid is immediate assistance provided to a sick or injured person until full medical treatment is available. First aid does not take the place of professional medical treatment.

Triple Zero (000) is Australia’s primary emergency call service number and should be used to access emergency assistance from all telephones (landline, mobile phones and payphones).

DGANCR, COMD AAC, and DGCADETS-AF must ensure that all IOC and OOC maintain currency in first aid training, including anaphylactic first aid.

ADF Cadets are responsible for the provision of sufficient and accessible first aid equipment.

ADF Cadets should consider the provision of Automated External Defibrillator (AED) for higher risk activities or higher risk environments (such as remote locations).

Ambulance. In the event that an ambulance is required to manage an ADF Cadets participant’s medical/health condition, the cost of the ambulance is covered by the ADF Cadets.

Defence health facilities and professionals. The primary purpose of Defence health facilities is the provision of health services to ADF members. However, Defence health facilities can provide emergency treatment to ADF Cadets participants, where activities occur on bases with a Defence health facility, until civilian emergency services arrive.

All medical/health incidents occurring during cadet activities must be reported in accordance with Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3.

Whenever a medical/health incident attracts media interest, the relevant ADF Cadets headquarters should adhere to the media policy of its parent Service.

ADF Cadets must ensure accurate records of any first aid treatment administered to ADF Cadets participants are stored in accordance with the Section 4 Chapter 3 Records Management and health records legislation.

Post-Emergency The Defence Casualty Manual, provides information relating to the Australians Dangerously Ill Scheme. The Scheme supports eligible IOC, OOC, and cadets who are hospitalised due to a very serious injury or serious injury as a result of an ADF Cadets activity.

Privacy

Disclosure of Personal Information. Defence personnel may disclose or authorise disclosure of personal information held by Defence about a youth or any other person to the youth’s parents/guardians/specified next of kin, or a responsible third party if:

  1. the youth has been involved in a youth protection event/incident (refer Section 3 Chapter 3)
  2. they are reasonably satisfied in the circumstances that it is necessary and appropriate for the personal information to be disclosed to protect the health, protection and wellbeing of the youth, having considered:
    1. the youth’s age and any wishes expressed by the youth
    2. the nature of the personal information and its relevance to the youth’s health, protection and wellbeing
    3. the nature and seriousness of the youth protection event/incident
    4. whether or not the youth or other person to whom the personal information relates is willing and able to self-disclose the information.

Privacy matters relevant to this policy are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)


[1] Cadets, DAH, IOC and OOC, as volunteers, are deemed to be workers under Section 7 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act), and Defence is deemed to be the employing authority.

[2] Comcare v Commonwealth of Australia [2009] Federal Court of Australia 700. The Undertaking given by the Commonwealth to Comcare.

Chapter 6: ADF Cadets Rehabilitation and Compensation

INTRODUCTION

Officers of Cadets (OOC), Instructors of Cadets (IOC) and cadets of the Australian Navy Cadets (ANC), Australian Army Cadets (AAC) and Australian Air Force Cadets (AAFC) are not Defence employees, but are covered under the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2004 (MRCA) for injury, disease or death relating to cadet activities on or after 01 July 2004. Those with service prior to 01 July 2004, may also have coverage under the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation (Defence-related Claims) Act 1988 (DRCA).

Defence Approved Helpers (DAH) are not eligible for compensation for injury, disease or death relating to cadet activities via DRCA or MRCA but may be covered for compensation by the Department of Defence’s insurance arrangement with Comcover.

POLICY INTENT

The intent of this policy is to:

  1. provide information regarding compensation arrangements for DAH through Comcover.
  2. provide information regarding Commonwealth rehabilitation and compensation arrangements for cadets, OOC and IOC of the ANC, AAC and AAFC under the DRCA and MRCA; and
  3. provide guidance on the provision of personal information including health information, by a Service Chief to the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA).
POLICY PRACTICES AND MEASURES

Comcover provides cover in the event of bodily injury or death to a voluntary worker. For cover to apply to voluntary workers, the worker must be a person who consents to undertake duties under the direction or at the request of an organisation, receives nil or nominal reward and does so on a temporary or casual basis. DAH, as volunteers may be eligible for rehabilitation, compensation and support under Comcover, under certain conditions. Comcover claims are processed through the Defence Insurance Office (DIO).

Cadets, OOC, and IOC of the ANC, AAC and AAFC are, under certain conditions, eligible for rehabilitation, compensation and support under the DRCA or MRCA.

The DRCA provides rehabilitation and compensation coverage for cadets, OOC and IOC of the ANC, AAC and AAFC for accepted conditions (ie injury or illness) arising from service from 03 January 1949 until, and including, 30 June 2004.

The MRCA provides rehabilitation and compensation coverage for cadets, OOC and IOC of the ANC, AAC and AAFC for accepted conditions (ie injuries or diseases) arising from service on or after 01 July 2004.

Both Acts provide coverage for injury, disease or death which have been:

  1. occasioned while attending cadet activities
  2. sustained while travelling between home and the place where they undertake cadet activities, including parades and camps
  3. materially contributed to or aggravated by ADF Cadet activities

DVA administers claims under both the DRCA and MRCA. Claimants may obtain further information on the DRCA and MRCA from the DVA website including a MRCA fact sheet.

Cadets, OOC and IOC of ANC, AAC and AAFC are not eligible for assistance under the ADF Rehabilitation Program. The rehabilitation authority where liability has been accepted for a claim for compensation in respect to an OOC, IOC or cadet related injury or illness is the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Commission.

Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), and the Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) are to ensure that if an ADF Cadets participant believes that they have sustained an injury or illness that is related to their involvement in ADF Cadets activities, a report is raised through their relevant ADF Cadet organisation in accordance with Section 2 Chapter 5 and submit a claim through their ADF Cadet organisation as soon as practicable to the appropriate compensation body as follows:

  1. DAH – Defence Insurance Office (DIO) via Comcover claim
  2. cadets, OOC or IOC – DVA via a MRCA or DRCA claim.

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure assistance is provided to ADF Cadets participants to complete compensation claims.

In order to ensure appropriate engagement between Defence and DVA or DIO, ADF Cadets must ensure procedures are implemented to enable timely and accurate notification of all incidents or fatalities involving ADF Cadets participants to Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD), the parent Service headquarters and the Chief of Defence Force (CDF) (refer Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3).

ADF Cadets must ensure that ADF Cadets participant’s information is collected, accessed, managed and disclosed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2, Defence Privacy Policy and the requirements of the DRCA and/or MRCA or Comcover as appropriate. Personal information records must be retained by the ADF Cadets organisations and made available to DVA or DIO on receipt of a lawful request.

In addition to the requirement to provide all relevant information to DVA or DIO in response to a claim, in the event of an ADF Cadets participant being involved in an incident, ADF Cadets must ensure the following information is disclosed to DVA or DIO as appropriate:

  1. the participant’s name and ADF Cadets organisation’s details
  2. that a serious incident or fatality, as defined in the Defence Casualty Manual, has occurred (including a general description of the nature and timing of that incident)
  3. the participant’s contact details (including current cadet unit), or the contact details of the participant’s cadet unit, as appropriate to the circumstances.

The provision of a participant’s personal information to DVA or DIO by a cadet organisation allows DVA or DIO to proactively engage with the participant to determine what assistance DVA or DIO may be able to provide should the participant intend to submit a claim under DRCA/ MRCA or Comcover. Early engagement by DVA or Comcover does not; however, constitute a claim or acceptance of liability under the relevant legislation nor does it remove from the participant the responsibility to submit a claim to DVA or DIO.

Records of activity attendance, injury, illness and treatment are to be retained by the ADF Cadet organisations in accordance with the Section 4 Chapter 3 as evidence for any claims made through DVA or DIO.

Director-General Defence Community organisation

Director-General Defence Community Organisation may provide assistance to the parent/guardian(s) of a cadet under the Australians Dangerously Ill Scheme in accordance with Chapter 2 of the Defence Casualty Manual.

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 1: ADF Cadets Mandated Training - To Be Issued

Chapter 1: ADF Cadets Mandated Training - To Be Issued Coming Soon

Chapter 2: ADF Cadets Military-Like Activites

INTRODUCTION

A distinguishing feature of the ADF Cadets is participation in activities in a military setting. These Military-Like Activities (MLA) promote characteristics such as leadership, team-work, self-esteem, resilience and respect amongst ADF Cadets participants. However, MLA may involve elevated risk factors for inexperienced youth and must therefore be conducted in a safe and secure manner which is consistent with domestic and international protocols.

POLICY INTENT

This policy outlines the minimum requirements for the safe and appropriate conduct of MLA within ADF Cadets consistent with domestic and international requirements.

POLICY PRACTICES AND MEASURES

All MLA are to be conducted in accordance with domestic legislation and policies, along with Australia’s commitment to the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of the Child and the Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict.

The Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and the Director General Cadets – Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) are to ensure that all MLA in their respective Cadet programs are:

  1. planned in a manner consistent with State/Territory and Commonwealth legislation, relevant Defence and ADF Cadets policies, and the United Nations Convention and Protocol
  2. conducted with the best interests and wellbeing (physical, psychological and emotional) of cadets as the primary consideration
  3. not to involve under any circumstance, the real or simulated use of force to an enemy, opposition or another human in order to achieve domination over them
  4. voluntary and age-appropriate
  5. observing of any restrictions limiting a cadet’s involvement in MLA, such as religious beliefs, medical conditions, or any other considerations as notified by the cadet’s parent/guardian (if under 18 years of age). Information relating to reasonable adjustments relative to limitations can be found in the Part 1 Section 6 Chapter 4.

Annex A provides further guidance relating to types of MLA not to be undertaken by ADF Cadets.

Information on the nature of MLA conducted within the ADF Cadets is freely available to the public. DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure that the following is explained to prospective adults, cadets and the parents/guardians of cadets during the application process, to enable ‘informed consent’ for participation:

  1. The nature and extent of MLA conducted in their respective Cadet programs.
  2. Participation in MLA is voluntary.
  3. Participation in the ADF Cadets and the associated participation in MLA is not a prerequisite for acceptance into the ADF.

Cadets must have specific written parental or guardian consent to be involved in MLA. If a cadet is under 18 years of age and recognised as living independently, in accordance with state or territory legislation, they may seek approval from DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF for an exemption from the parental permission requirements.

RELATED INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS

Chapter 3: ADF Cadets Overseas Activities

INTRODUCTION

Participation in the ADF Cadets, including the Australian Navy Cadets (ANC), the Australian Army Cadets (AAC) and the Australian Air Force Cadets (AAFC), provides young people with opportunities to develop skills and behaviours that cultivate a socially responsible attitude towards Defence and the Australian community.

Defence supports the ADF Cadets in delivering coordinated, coherent and well governed activities that offer a safe and positive experience for youth. These include exchanges between ADF Cadets and like‑minded international cadet organisations, and independent overseas activities that encourage understanding, cooperation, goodwill and friendship among young people from different international, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

POLICY INTENT

The purpose of this policy is to outline opportunities that may be available to ADF Cadets Adults and Youth to participate in international exchange programs and independent overseas activities, and to provide direction on how ADF Cadets support and facilitate these activities.

International Cadet Associations

International cadet associations have existed for many years and include the International Sea Cadets Association (ISCA), the Army Cadet Exchange (ACE) Association and the International Air Cadet Exchange (IACE)

ADF Cadets have long been members of these international cadet associations and have benefitted from the opportunities they provide to Australian youth. ADF Cadets Adults and Youth have travelled overseas on a regular basis to participate in international exchange programs, and have also hosted visits of international cadet organisations to Australia in return. Exchanges are conducted with a variety of countries including the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, New Zealand, France, South Korea, Turkey and the Netherlands.

International exchange programs provide young people with different cultural experiences. The programs concentrate on promoting goodwill, social interaction, trust and friendship, while learning about foreign places and observing how cadet units from other countries operate.

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). Involvement in the international cadet associations is typically facilitated through an MOU between participating nations.

Further information on the three international cadet associations is shown at Annex A.

Requirements for international exchange programs

Escorts. All cadets participating in international exchange programs are to be accompanied by a sufficient number of Cadet Officers and Instructors, of mixed rank and gender where possible, to ensure adequate supervision of cadet participants.

Fees and charges. Each international exchange program has associated costs which are normally shared between the host country, visiting nations and participating cadets.

Logistics support. Financial and logistic support is normally provided by the host country for inbound international exchanges, subject to funding availability, and should include suitable accommodation, meals, internal transport and the costs of activities conducted during the exchange.

Travel costs. For outbound international exchanges, the sending nation is responsible for the cost of travel to and from the host country. Dependent on the type of activity, travel costs may be fully funded by Defence, partially funded by Defence or fully funded by participants. Additionally, sponsorship from external sources may contribute to travel costs. ADF Cadets will ensure the funding of travel costs for each activity is clearly defined for all participants.

Annual Planning Conference. An annual planning conference is normally held by each international cadet association, hosted by one of the participating countries. At these conferences, each participating country will have a one-to-one debrief opportunity to discuss any changes/recommendations that may be relevant following the completed exchange programs from that year. Details of the exchange program dates for the following year are also discussed and approved, and action is subsequently taken to implement the agreed program. International cadet exchanges are scheduled around Australian school holidays as far as possible.

ADF cadets support to international exchange programs

As a general principle, ADF Cadets are to proactively engage with international cadet associations and seek opportunities for adult and youth participants to become involved with inbound and outbound international exchange programs.

International Liaison Officer. ADF Cadets are encouraged to appoint an International Liaison Officer (ILO) who will be responsible for communicating with participating countries through the international cadet associations and advising on all matters relating to international exchange programs both inbound and outbound. Where possible, the ILO should attend the respective international cadet association’s annual planning conference to assist with planning and coordination of the exchange program. Attendance at the Annual Planning Conference is at the discretion of Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and the Director General Cadets – Air Force (DGCADETS-AF).

Selection criteria. Each ADF Cadets program should develop appropriate selection criteria and a selection process to ensure that only the most suitable, best performing and committed cadets and escort officers are chosen to participate in international exchange programs. Successful candidates should be highly recommended in order to avoid any potential incidents of unacceptable behaviour or poor conduct during the exchange program.

Selection criteria should include consideration of the candidate’s:

  1. age, gender, rank, position and time enrolled
  2. health and medical status
  3. physical fitness
  4. dietary restrictions
  5. court orders preventing travel outside Australia
  6. willingness to participate in any media / promotional activities
  7. overall contribution to their cadet unit.

Applications to participate in international exchange programs are managed in accordance with ANC, AAC and AAFC procedures.

Final approval of applications must be sought and obtained from the DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF, or their delegates, prior to expenditure of Defence funds for all inbound and outbound international exchanges.

Independent overseas activities

Individual ADF Cadets units may arrange independent overseas tours to battlefields and other locations of significant military history (e.g. Kokoda, Hellfire Pass) or to other international destinations to experience military type activities (e.g. Nijmegen March, Edinburgh Military Tattoo). These overseas activities are not associated with international exchange programs and are approved, funded and managed in accordance with the ANC, AAC and AAFC overseas activities policy.

When conducting independent overseas activities, cadets and the escorting officers are personally responsible for all travel costs including fees and charges, although in some cases sponsorship from external sources may be available to some participants. Commonwealth funds are not to be used for independent overseas activities.

General Requirements for overseas activities

Parental/Guardian consent. Applications for cadets to attend international exchange programs or independent overseas activities should be accompanied by signed parental/guardian consent forms which provide permission for their child to travel overseas. Respective ADF Cadets programs should develop appropriate consent forms for signature by parents or guardians to facilitate this requirement.

Passports. Each participant of an overseas activity should hold an Australian passport valid for a minimum period of six months upon their return to Australia. The costs associated with obtaining the passport should normally be at the participants own expense.

Withdrawal. Applicants should be made aware that approval to participate in international exchange programs or independent overseas activities may be withdrawn at any time should circumstances dictate.

Travel Insurance. ADF Cadets must ensure that those who participate in non‑Defence funded overseas activities take out appropriate travel insurance covering at a minimum the activities being conducted, medical costs and air fares. Proof of insurance cover may be requested prior to travel.

Smart Traveller. ADF Cadets must ensure that travel information and advice promulgated by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) is complied with for all outbound overseas activities.

Approval. Approval documentation for an overseas activity is to be submitted in accordance with Defence, Service and individual ADF Cadets organisation policy and procedures.

Management of Overseas Incidents. Unacceptable Behaviour in the Defence Youth Protection context is behaviour that, having regard to all the circumstances, would be considered: unlawful; offensive, belittling, abusive or threatening to youth and/or adverse to their morale, health, safety and wellbeing; or otherwise not in the interests of Defence. Incidents that occur during overseas activities may be subject to the laws of the overseas country. Although the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) may provide assistance in circumstances involving potentially unlawful behaviour, ADF Cadets must ensure that any Youth Protection event/incidents that occur during overseas activities are reported and managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3. Where an incident necessitates an unscheduled return to Australia of an ADF Cadets Adult or Youth participant, associated travel costs will normally be attributable according to the travel funding arrangements of the activity, dependent on whether the activity is funded by Defence or self-funded by the participant. Consideration of the impact of returning a person to Australia on the continued viability of the activity (normally youth supervisory ratios) should be addressed within planning and applicable contingency arrangements.

Privacy

Privacy matters relevant to this policy are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Annex:

  1. International Exchange Programs
Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 4: ADF Cadets Defence Weapons

INTRODUCTION

ADF Cadets is a youth development program that instils Defence’s values and inculcates a sense of service to the community within youth. It is conducted in a military like environment. Weapons are an intrinsic part of military life and, as such, activities involving the use of weapons are critical to providing a military like experience for cadets.

All Defence weapons activities must have the ADF Cadets participant’s best interests (including their physical, psychological and emotional wellbeing) as the primary consideration, and must comply with Work Health and Safety policy and Defence Youth Safety Framework (Part 1).

POLICY INTENT

This policy provides direction and guidance on the use of Defence weapons, associated equipment and ammunition to ADF Cadets. This policy is to be read in conjunction with the ADF Cadets Military-Like Activities policy (Section 2 Chapter 9), the Defence Security Principles Framework (DSPF), and the Defence Training Area Management Manual (DTAMM), and has been developed in accordance with Australia’s commitment to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict. This policy excludes Cadet Firearms, which are covered in Section 3 Chapter 5.

DEFINITION OF A DEFENCE WEAPON

DSPF Control 78.1 Weapons Security para 43 defines a Defence weapon as ‘a weapon owned by Defence to meet the operational, training and support requirements of the Permanent and Reserve members of the ADF’. For the purposes of differentiating storage and transportation security requirements, Defence weapons are subcategorised into:

  1. Small arms Defence weapons. Defence weapons that are:
    1. only capable of firing a round smaller than 20 millimetres calibre, regardless of being either man-portable or platform-mounted or
    2. which are of a calibre greater than 20 millimetres, but are man-portable, such as section-level grenade launchers and rocket launchers
  2. Large Defence Weapons. Defence weapons which can fire a round of 20 millimetre calibre or greater and are not considered man-portable
  3. Superseded Defence Weapons. Defence weapons that are no longer managed as a part of the operational inventory but are retained by Defence for any purpose
  4. Replica Defence Weapons. Inert instruments made to replicate the size, weight and/or shape of a live firing Defence weapon, or its component parts. Replica weapons include red guns, instruction weapons and instructional replicas
  5. Controlled parts. Defence weapon components and sub-assemblies that require the same security measures as a complete Defence weapon. They are those parts of weapons that are the most difficult to manufacture and substitute, and without which the weapon is inoperable
  6. Edged Defence Weapons. Edged implements used for making or repelling an attack; includes combat knives and bayonets, but does not include ceremonial swords and ceremonial lances[1]
  7. Innocuous Defence Weapons. Defence weapons that have been rendered incapable of discharging a projectile to the satisfaction of engineering standards within Defence (for further information see DSPF Control 78.1 para 30 Rendering Weapons Innocuous). Innocuous Defence weapons include Weapon Training Simulation System (WTSS) weapons, some sectionalised training aids and any Defence weapons in the subcategories above which have been rendered innocuous
  8. Captured Weapons. Weapons captured or seized on operations that fall within one or more of the subcategories above are to be treated as Defence weapons for the purposes of storage, transportation and disposal.
USE OF DEFENCE WEAPONS, ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT AND AMMUNITION BY ADF CADETS

ADF cadets must ensure access to and use of Defence weapons and ammunition by ADF Cadets participants is in accordance with Defence policy and procedures. All requests for Defence weapons are to be in accordance with Defence policy and ADF Cadets procedures.

ADF Cadets must ensure ammunition is requested, handled and acquitted in accordance with Defence policy and ADF Cadets procedures.

ADF Cadets must ensure Defence weapons are stored and transported in accordance with DSPF Principle 78 and in accordance with the provisions of Defence Explosive Ordnance Publications 101 (eDEOP 101) for the management and safety of explosive ordnance activities.

ADF Cadets must ensure ADF Cadets Adults complete the weapons and explosive ordnance training courses if they are handling and/or transporting bulk weapons and/or handling bulk ammunition.

ADF Cadets must ensure activities involving the live firing of Defence weapons by ADF Cadets participants must only be conducted by ADF members who are to be:

  1. qualified and permitted to conduct Defence weapons activities in accordance with Defence policy and relevant Cadet organisation procedures
  2. currently qualified to use the weapon in accordance with their parent Service's requirements.

ADF Cadets must ensure range practices comply with the requirements of:

  1. LWP–G 7–3–0 ADF Range Orders (General)
  2. LWP–G 7–3–1 ADF Range Orders (Dismounted)
  3. LWP-G 7-3-21 Small Arms Range Practices (TBI)
  4. Standing Orders applicable to the range on which the practice is fired as issued by:
    1. Directorate of Operations and Training Area Management for Estate and Infrastructure Group-managed ranges and Non-Defence Training Areas (NDTA)
    2. Range Control Officers for all other ranges
  5. Authorised ADF handling procedures for the weapon(s) and practice being fired.

ADF Cadets must ensure all innocuous weapons and associated equipment are recorded on an internal database, called the Cadet Firearms Register (FaR). The FaR forms part of the CadetNet information system and records the following information:

  1. the manufacturer, type, serial number, make and model of each innocuous weapon
  2. current facility and a permanent audit trail of all movements and storage of the innocuous weapon
  3. the applicable identifying number of the innocuous weapon.

Privately owned weapons are prohibited from being stowed in ADF Cadets units.

ADF Cadets must ensure innocuous weapons registered on the FaR are audited through monthly assurance stocktakes no later than the last day of each month and are audited at a minimum of bi-annually in accordance with Defence Logistics Manual (DEFLOGMAN).

ADF Cadets must ensure the possession, control, storage, transportation and registration of innocuous weapons and ammunition complies with DSPF Principle 78. Innocuous weapons registered in the FaR are Commonwealth property and as such, pursuant to the requirements of DSPF Principle 78. ADF Cadets participants are not required, under a law of a State or a Territory, to obtain or hold a licence or other permission to possess, use or transport a registered innocuous weapon for, or during, an approved ADF Cadets activity.[2]

Use of defence weapons must be on authorised ranges

ADF Cadets must ensure ADF Cadets participants only live-fire approved weapons at Defence ranges or non-Defence ranges certified to allow the ammunition being used, which may include:

  1. Defence-approved NDTA (e.g. civilian rifle ranges/gun clubs)
  2. Royal Australian Navy (RAN) ships, with the approval of the Commanding Officer of the ship.

A civilian range is considered Defence-approved when the requirements specified in the DTAMM have been met. ADF Cadets must ensure that approved non-Defence ranges are certified and are only used while their Certificate of Range Safety Compliance remains current.

Approved Activities

ADF Cadets must ensure participation in ADF Cadets activities involving the use of Defence weapons is completely voluntary for all ADF Cadets participants. Participation in an activity that involves the use of Defence weapons is not a prerequisite for involvement in the ADF Cadets program, however there may be individual activities or courses where the use of a Defence weapon is a requirement.

ADF Cadets must ensure before participating in a Defence weapons activity, that a cadet who is under 18 years of age has the written consent of their parent/guardian to participate. Such consent may be given or withdrawn at the time of initial enrolment, and/or prior to participating in a particular Defence weapons activity.

A cadet under 18 years of age who is recognised as living independently under applicable State/Territory legislation may in accordance with ADF Cadet procedures seek approval from Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), and the Director General Cadets – Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) or their delegate for exemption from the requirement for parental consent. The cadet may participate if approval is given.

ADF Cadets must ensure ADF Cadets participants are not permitted to use or fire any Service or other pistol and may only use the following Defence weapons for Defence-approved live-fire practices:

  1. Family of F88 and EF88 AUSTEYR weapons
  2. Individual and crew served machine guns that do not fire High Explosives (HE) ordnance
  3. other small arms approved for live-firing by DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF.

For ceremonial activities ADF Cadets participants are authorised to use the following Defence weapons small arms and innocuous Defence weapons small arms:

  1. ANC: CDF-W (Ceremonial Drill Firearm - White) Replica L1A1 SLR and F88i (Innocuous) AUSTEYR[3]
  2. AAC: F-88 AUSTEYR with blank ammunition and F88i (Innocuous) AUSTEYR with ceremonial bayonets
  3. AAFC: F88i (Innocuous) AUSTEYR, L1A1 SLR Innocuous.

ADF Cadets must ensure the possession, control, storage, transportation and registration of innocuous Defence weapons complies with DFSP Principle 78. Loss or theft of, or other incidents concerning innocuous Defence weapons, must be reported in accordance with DSPF Principle 78, eDEOP 101 and ADF Cadets procedures.

Subject to the requirements of this policy and approval from DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF or their delegate, ADF Cadets participants may participate in the following approved activities:

  1. WTSS Practices. Cadets may use all small arms (including machine guns) approved for ADF Cadets use that have been adapted for WTSS use except for the pistol. Cadets may not participate in any WTTS Computer Generated Imagery scenario, other than the ‘falling plate’ practice. Cadets are not authorised to use any weapon in the WTSS that simulates a HE nature.
  2. Familiarisation Activities. Subject to any additional procedures, ADF Cadets participants may fire Defence weapons, approved for ADF Cadets use, in a familiarisation activity or practice if they:
    1. have parental consent (where required) in accordance with this policy
    2. display behaviour consistent with the ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth)
    3. have completed their initial induction training
    4. are fit and able to handle a Defence weapon
    5. are under the direct supervision of qualified ADF members in accordance with relevant Defence and ADF Cadets procedures applicable to such activities or practice
    6. have completed the minimum training requirements for participation in a familiarisation activity or practice for the weapon, as specified by the relevant cadet organisation procedure.
  3. Qualification Activities. Subject to any additional ADF Cadets procedures, ADF Cadets participants may fire Defence weapons approved for ADF cadets use in a qualification shoot if they:
    1. have parental consent (where required) in accordance with this policy
    2. display behaviour consistent with the ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth)
    3. are fit and able to handle a Defence weapon.

ADF Cadets must ensure ADF Cadets participants who are involved in live‑fire or WTTS practices do not use targets that are representative of humans or animals.

Use of similar weapons of defence forces of other nations in approved international competitions

ADF Cadets must ensure ADF Cadets Instructors of Cadets (IOC), Officers of Cadets (OOC) and cadets use approved small arms of other nations in international competitions or activities, provided that:

  1. the IOC, OOC or cadet is eligible to use a similar type of weapon under this policy
  2. the Service Chief or their delegate has approved the activity
  3. the IOC, OOC or cadet has been briefed and has displayed, to the satisfaction of a qualified operator of the weapon, a suitable understanding of the safe handling and operation of the weapon before undertaking the activity
  4. in the case of cadets, they have parental consent, or a cadet under 18 years of age who is recognised as living independently under applicable State/Territory legislation has, in accordance with ADF Cadets procedures, sought approval through their respective cadet organisation for exemption from the requirement for parental consent, and the DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF, as applicable, has given such approval.

Records of defence weapons training

ADF Cadets must ensure that a record of all Defence weapons training completed by ADF Cadets participants forms part of the participant’s general ADF Cadets record.

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

DGANCR, COMD AAC AND DGCADETS-AF

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are responsible for:

  1. approving all ADF weapons activities for live-firing by ADF Cadets, under this policy
  2. specifying the minimum training requirement for participation in a familiarisation practice or a qualification shoot under this policy
  3. ensuring compliance with applicable publications such as the Defence Training Area (DTA) Range Standing Orders, LWP-G 7-3-0, LWP-G 7-3-1 and Defence weapon procedure publications
  4. use, allocation, storage, transport and registration in FaR of innocuous Defence weapons in accordance with DSPF Principle 78.
RELATED INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS

[1] Ceremonial bayonets for approved AAC ceremonial activities are authorised to be fitted to F88i AUSTEYRS.

[2] Defence Regulation 2013 Section 12 refers.

[3] The CDF-W Replica L1A1 SLR is the ANC in-service drill rifle until it is replaced by the F88i.

Chapter 5: ADF Cadets Firearms

INTRODUCTION

Training in firearms safety and handling, including the live firing of small arms, is a feature of the ADF Cadets as youth development programs, and among the features of the scheme that attract young people. ADF Cadets provides the opportunity for participants to experience the safe handling of firearms, including simulated and/or live firing practices. Security policies may impose practical constraints on ADF Cadets gaining access to Defence weapons. The use within the ADF Cadets of Commonwealth procured, owned and approved CZ452 bolt action rifles in .22 Long Rifle calibre rifles (cadet firearms) provides a means for increasing the accessibility of firearms training to cadet units.

Cadet firearms are used to develop safety, discipline, competence and confidence in the handling of firearms, through a logically phased sequence of training to a level where cadets can participate in live firing on a controlled Defence range or Defence-approved civilian range.

Safety is the paramount consideration in the use of cadet firearms.

POLICY INTENT

This policy provides direction and guidance to ADF Cadets for the use, procurement, allocation, storage, transport, registration and servicing of cadet firearms, associated equipment and ammunition. It operates in conjunction with the ADF Cadets Military-Like Activities policy (Section 3 Chapter 2), the Defence Security Principles Framework (DSPF) and the Defence Training Area Management Manual (DTAMM). It has been developed in accordance with Australia’s commitment to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict.

POLICY PRACTICES AND MEASURES

Approved Firearms

In accordance with DSPF Principle 78, cadet firearms are firearms that are not Defence weapons but are approved by Defence for use by ADF Cadets and are limited specifically to:

  1. ADF Cadet unit-controlled or privately purchased firearms stored at ADF Cadet units or in armouries by Defence sponsor units
  2. ADF Cadet unit-controlled or privately purchased innocuous or replica firearms used for training, drill, and ceremonial purposes.[1]

ADF Cadets must ensure only approved firearms are to be used as cadet firearms. Chief of Army, as Lead Capability Manager (LCM) for cadet firearms, has approved the CZ452 bolt action rifles in .22 Long Rifle calibre, for use as the live fire cadet firearms.

Use of any firearms, other than Commonwealth provided firearms approved by the LCM, is prohibited.

The AAFC is approved to use the .303 Short Magazine Lee Enfield (SMLE) Innocuous for ceremonial occasions.

The .303 SMLE Innocuous is included as a cadet firearm and is to be managed in accordance with this policy.

Participation

ADF Cadets must ensure participation in ADF Cadets activities that involve the use of cadet firearms is completely voluntary for all ADF Cadets participants. Participation in an activity that involves the use of cadet firearms is not to be a prerequisite for attendance at any other ADF Cadets activity, other than follow‑on activities involving the use of cadet firearms.

ADF Cadets must ensure before participating in a cadet firearms activity, that a cadet who is under 18 years of age must have the written consent of their parent or guardian to participate in firearms activities. Such consent may be given or withdrawn at the time of initial enrolment, and/or prior to participating in a particular activity. Parental consent must be placed on the cadet’s firearms training record.

A cadet under 18 years of age who is recognised as living independently under applicable State/Territory legislation may seek written approval from Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), and the Director General Cadets – Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) or their delegate, as applicable, for exemption from the requirement for parental consent. The written approval must be placed on the cadet’s firearm training record.

ADF Cadets must ensure cadet firearms are only handled by ADF Cadets participants who are approved to participate in the firearms activity. Cadets must hold the relevant consent or approval in accordance with the requirements of their patent Service. ADF Cadets participants who handle cadet firearms when their enrolment or acceptance is not current or they are not registered and signed in for an approved activity involving cadet firearms, may be in breach of the criminal code and Defence policy.

Cadet Firearms Register

ADF Cadets must ensure all cadet firearms, innocuous firearms and associated equipment are recorded on an internal database, called the Firearms Register (FaR). The FaR forms part of the CadetNet information system and records the following information:

  1. the manufacturer, type, serial number, make and model of each firearm and innocuous weapon
  2. status of compliance of the firearm with inspection and servicing requirements
  3. current facility and a permanent audit trail of all movements and storage of the firearm
  4. the applicable identifying number of the firearm.

Privately owned firearms are prohibited from being stowed in ADF Cadet units.

ADF Cadets must ensure operational cadet firearms registered on the FaR are audited through monthly assurance stocktakes no later than the last day of each month and innocuous Defence weapons are audited at a minimum of bi-annually in accordance with Defence Logistics Manual (DEFLOGMAN).

ADF Cadets must ensure the possession, control, storage, transportation and registration of cadet firearms, innocuous weapons and ammunition complies with DSPF Principle 78. Cadet firearms registered in the FaR are Commonwealth property and as such, pursuant to the requirements of DSPF Principle 78. ADF Cadets participants are not required, under a law of a State or a Territory, to obtain or hold a licence or other permission to possess, use or transport a registered cadet firearm for, or during, an approved ADF Cadets activity.[2]

Storage and transportation

As a matter of Defence policy, the Firearms Act 1996 (NSW) is the minimum standard to be applied to the control, secure storage and transport of cadet firearms, associated equipment and ammunition. Where Commonwealth, State/Territory legislation imposes more stringent requirements in respect of the control, secure storage or transport of cadet firearms, associated equipment and ammunition, the higher standard is to be applied.

Actual or suspected contraventions of Commonwealth, State and Territory firearms legislation involving cadet firearms are potential civilian criminal offences. Potential civilian criminal offences are notifiable incidents that must be reported in accordance with DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF procedures and the DSPF.

Approved Activities

ADF Cadets must ensure cadet firearms are only used for approved activities. Service Chiefs or their delegates may approve ADF Cadets activities for the use of cadet firearms, in accordance with the guidance of the LCM. Such activities may include:

  1. training (being training other than live firing) in the safe handling, maintenance and operation of cadet firearms
  2. live firing of a cadet firearm.

Where a Service Chief or their delegate approves activities that include the live firing of cadet firearms, the Service Chief or their delegate must ensure the Defence training syllabus for cadet firearms, which provides the requisite knowledge, skills and attitudes to fire the firearm safely and competently, is completed by the ADF Cadets participant before participating in a live firing activity.

Use of cadet firearms and/or ammunition, other than for an approved activity, is prohibited.

ADF Cadets must ensure ADF Cadets participants only use cadet firearms for approved non-live firing firearms familiarisation training when they:

  1. have parental consent or DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF approval (where required) which has not been withdrawn, in accordance with participation requirements of this chapter
  2. display behaviour consistent with the ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth)
  3. are fit and able to participate
  4. have completed their initial induction/recruit training
  5. have completed the approved training syllabus for the relevant cadet firearm.

ADF Cadets must ensure ADF Cadets participants who have not completed the approved training syllabus for the relevant type of cadet firearm are to only use cadet firearms in a live firing familiarisation activity when they:

  1. have parental consent or DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF approval (where required) which has not been withdrawn, in accordance with participation requirements of this chapter
  2. display behaviour consistent with the ADF Cadets Code of Conduct (Youth)
  3. are fit and able to participate
  4. have completed their initial induction/recruit training
  5. are under the direct 'one-on-one' supervision of qualified ADF members and/or Officers of Cadets (OOC) and/or Instructors of Cadets (IOC), in accordance with relevant Defence and ADF Cadets procedures applicable to such activities.

Use of Firearms of Other Nations in Approved International Competitions

ADF Cadets participants may use firearms of other nations when participating in international competitions or activities approved by their Service Chief or delegate, provided that:

  1. ADF Cadets participants are eligible to use a similar type of firearm in accordance with this chapter
  2. the Service Chief or delegate, has approved the use of the firearm as suitable for the activity being conducted
  3. ADF Cadets participants have been briefed and have displayed, to the satisfaction of a qualified operator of the firearm, a suitable understanding of the safe handling and operation of the firearm before undertaking the activity
  4. ADF Cadets participants are fit and able to participate
  5. parental consent has been provided for cadets or an ADF Cadet under 18 years of age, who is recognised as living independently under applicable State/Territory legislation has, in accordance with ADF Cadets procedures, been approved by DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF for exemption from the requirement for parental consent.

Records of Firearms Training

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must maintain, in respect of each participant, a record of all firearms training completed by the participant. The participant's firearm record is to include any relevant civilian qualifications and competencies held by the participant, which may form part of a general record for the participant.

Safety

ADF Cadets must ensure all cadet firearm activities have the cadets’ best interests (including their physical, psychological and emotional wellbeing) as the primary consideration.

ADF Cadets must ensure cadet firearms are only handled by ADF Cadets participants who:

  1. are currently enrolled or accepted in a cadet organisation
  2. are registered to participate in an approved cadet activity involving cadet firearms
  3. have successfully completed the relevant training requirements listed in this policy
  4. hold the permissions and approvals in accordance with this chapter.

Targets

ADF Cadets must ensure the use of targets representative of humans or animals in the course of ADF Cadets activities are not used under any circumstance.

Officers in Charge, Safety Supervisors and AMMUNITION SAFETY SUPERVISORS for ADF Cadets Cadet Firearms activities

ADF Cadets must ensure all OOC and IOC who participate as Officers in Charge and/or Safety Supervisors during ADF Cadets approved activities complete the following training packages:

  1. Combined Army Training Centre (CATC) Training Management Package for the CZ452.22LR calibre cadet rifle
  2. CATC Conduct and Supervise on Restricted Permanent Basic Range.

OOC and IOC may be required to complete additional ADF Cadets procedures training packages.

ADF Cadets must ensure OOC and IOC have an appropriate level of live-fire cadet firearms experience, as determined by their relevant cadet organisation, prior to applying to become an Officer in Charge Practice or Safety Supervisor.

ADF Cadets must ensure OOC and IOC who have completed the relevant firearms training requirements and who act as Safety Supervisors for ADF Cadets live-fire practices supervise no more than four members in total at any one time.

Procurement and Allocation

ADF Cadets must ensure cadet firearms are procured in accordance with Commonwealth procurement rules. Procedures for requesting the procurement of cadet firearms are to be specified by the LCM.

ADF Cadets may approve a cadet unit to hold cadet firearms and Innocuous Defence weapons.

ADF Cadets must not approve a cadet unit to hold cadet firearms unless:

  1. the cadet unit has a Firearms Quality Manager (FQM) or Firearms Manager (FM) appointed in accordance with the roles and responsibilities described in this policy
  2. the cadet unit has a secure storage facility in accordance with this policy
  3. the cadet unit has passed a site security inspection by Defence security personnel or local State/Territory police
  4. the cadet unit satisfies the safe storage of firearms IAW the Firearms Act 1996 (NSW) as a minimum.

A cadet unit requesting to hold cadet firearms must apply for approval through their chain of command to DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF, as applicable. If approved, DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF will liaise with the LCM to procure the firearms.

ADF Cadets must ensure cadet firearms are only procured in accordance with this policy.

Servicing

ADF Cadets must ensure that cadet firearms held in a cadet unit are technically inspected and serviced annually, or within the preceding 12 months of its use, by a licensed gunsmith or approved armourer, in accordance with any instructions issued by the LCM.

ADF Cadets must ensure a firearm that does not meet manufacturer’s specifications, or fails the annual technical inspection and service, is not used for live‑firing until such time as it has been repaired by a licensed gunsmith or approved armourer and meets the original equipment manufacturer’s specifications. Any firearm that cannot be repaired to the specified requirements must be lawfully disposed of in accordance with LCM instructions.

Security Appointment Briefings

DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF must ensure an OOC or IOC is appointed as FQM or FM, responsible for the security of cadet firearms and associated equipment within each cadet unit holding cadet firearms. An OOC or IOC may be appointed as an Assistant Firearms Manager (AFM) to assist the FQM or FM.

DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGACDETS-AF, must ensure a formal brief is provided to the FQM/FM and any AFM, on their initial appointment and annually thereafter, covering the responsibilities of their position, relevant Defence policies, firearms and explosive ordnance training, and any related ADF Cadets procedures. The FQM/FM and AFM are to acknowledge in writing that they have read and understood the information provided. A record of the date the brief was provided must be maintained in accordance with ADF Cadets procedures.

Physical Security cadet firearms and innocuous weapons

Storage containers. ADF Cadets must ensure cadet firearms are stored in accordance with the DSPF Principle 78 ‘Storage of Cadet Firearms’ and the Firearms Act 1996 (NSW).

Transport. ADF Cadets must ensure cadet firearms are transported in accordance with DSPF ‘Transporting Cadet Firearms’.

Non-Defence facilities. Cadet firearms may be stored at a non-Defence facility subject to the approval of DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF or their delegates, as applicable, and the completion of a satisfactory Defence-approved site security survey. For this purpose, a non‑Defence facility includes but is not limited to:

  1. a cadet unit not located on a Defence facility
  2. a local rifle or gun club armoury
  3. an approved range or shooting centre
  4. a police station.

ADF Cadets must ensure a certificate of inspection is obtained from the inspecting authority and is either:

  1. displayed prominently at the cadet unit near the ADF Cadets firearms storage container
  2. displayed at the non-Defence training area
  3. available to be viewed on request by ADF Cadets participants.

ADF Cadets must ensure no cadet firearms are stored at private residences under any circumstances.

Security Keys

Keys to a cadet firearms storage container, or other Defence-approved container or facility, constitute security keys.

ADF Cadets must ensure security keys for Defence approved containers or facilities are only held by an OOC or IOC in the ADF Cadets and the FQM/FM, who must be aware of and adhere to any applicable security requirements contained in the DSPF. Security keys are to be protected from unauthorised access and shielded from view when not in use.

Security keys must be checked during each monthly firearms assurance stocktake in accordance with DEFLOGMAN and conducted in accordance with the Electronic Supply Chain Manual V04S08C19A Stocktaking and Reporting of Cadet Firearms.

ADF Cadets must ensure security keys are not duplicated, except with the written approval of DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF as applicable.

ADF Cadets must ensure the designated ADF Cadets OOC/IOC or FQM/FM keep the security keys in a locked container when not in use.

ADF Cadets must ensure the loss of security keys is reported as a major security incident in accordance with the DSPF and ADF Cadets procedures. If security keys are lost, the lock on the key safe is to be considered compromised and must be replaced immediately.

Ammunition

ADF Cadets must ensure only Defence-approved ammunition, supplied through the Defence supply system, is used. Ammunition provided through the ADF supply system is to be requested, handled and acquitted in accordance with Defence policy and ADF Cadets procedures.

DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGACDETS-AF or their delegates may approve cadet units procuring LCM approved commercially available ammunition, if delivery is outside the range of the Defence Service Provider.

ADF Cadets must ensure blank, hand-loaded or self-constructed ammunition in cadet firearms is not used under any circumstances.

ADF Cadets must ensure ammunition is only stored in:

  1. the appropriate packaging and not loaded in magazines
  2. in accordance with the principles, standards and procedures for the management and safety of explosive ordnance activities described in the DSPF Principle 79.

ADF Cadets must ensure ammunition for cadet firearms only issued for use:

  1. at authorised ADF Cadets live fire activities
  2. by properly appointed ADF Cadets OOC/IOC or ADF members.

ADF Cadets must ensure cadets only have access to cadet firearms and ammunition at the designated firing point under the supervision of properly appointed OOC/IOC or ADF personnel.

ADF Cadets must ensure cadet firearms are only placed in the loaded condition at the firing point.

Authorised Ranges

ADF Cadets must ensure ADF Cadets participants only live-fire cadet firearms at Defence ranges or non-Defence ranges certified to allow the ammunition being used. Authorised ranges include:

  1. Defence ranges
  2. Defence-approved Non-Defence Training Area (NDTA) (e.g. civilian rifle ranges/gun clubs)
  3. Royal Australian Navy (RAN) ships, with the approval of the Commanding Officer of the ship.

ADF Cadets must ensure supervising staff controlling and supervising range practices involving ADF Cadets participants:

  1. comply with LWP-G 7-3-0 Australian Defence Force Range Orders (General) and LWP-G-7-3-1 Australian Defence Force Range Orders (Dismounted)

  2. Comply with Range Standing Orders applicable to the range on which the practice is fired as issued by:
    1. Directorate of Operations and Training Area Management (DOTAM) for Estate and Infrastructure Group-managed ranges and NDTA
    2. Range Control Officers for all other ranges

  3. comply with authorised ADF procedures for the firearm(s) and practice(s) being fired

  4. for Defence ranges, be qualified in accordance with applicable ADF weapons and range requirements or hold a Defence-approved civilian qualification.

A civilian range is considered Defence-approved when the requirements outlined in the DTAMM have been met. Approved non-Defence ranges are certified and ADF Cadets must ensure are only used while the Certificate of Range Safety Compliance remains current.

Standing Orders

All ranges used by ADF Cadets are subject to standing orders issued by either the single Service operator or the regional office of DOTAM. Standing orders contain detailed procedures for the use of Defence-approved ranges, both Defence and non-Defence, and ADF Cadets must ensure ADF Cadets participants comply with standing orders at all times.

All non-Defence ranges are subject to standing orders issued by the regional DOTAM office. The procedures and regulations in regional DOTAM Non‑Defence Training Area Standing Orders may differ from those issued by civilian managers of the range. In all cases, ADF Cadets must ensure all cadet units comply with the regional DOTAM standing orders for each non-Defence range approved for Defence and ADF Cadets use.

Range Sentries

An OOC or IOC may be appointed as a Range Sentry by the Officer in Charge of the range practice. ADF Cadets must ensure the Officer in Charge briefs the OOC or IOC on the duties of a sentry, in accordance with the relevant Range Standing Orders, and OOC/IOC acknowledges receipt of the brief by initialling the master range instruction.

ADF Cadets must ensure cadets are NOT appointed as range sentries.

LOSS, THEFT OR UNAUTHORISED DISPOSAL OF CADET FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION

ADF Cadets must ensure in the event that cadet firearms or ammunition are suspected or confirmed as lost, disposed of without authorised or stolen, the following actions are taken:

  1. Initial Action. The incident must be reported in accordance with DSPF Principle 78, Defence Explosive Ordnance Publication (eDEOP 101) and ADF Cadets procedures. A stock-take must be conducted to ascertain exactly what is missing or stolen and records checked in accordance with the following:
    1. Against the FaR for cadet firearms
    2. eDEOP 101 to determine the last time ammunition was accounted for.
  2. Incident Report. Once the initial action is complete, DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF, as applicable, must make an incident report in accordance with the DSPF, and ADF Cadets procedures. The incident report must contain, so far as possible, the status and any findings of investigations by police and/or Defence agencies.

Where the report recommends any remedial action, DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF may cancel or suspend the cadet unit’s approval to hold cadet firearms and arrange for alternative storage of the cadet firearms until the remedial action is completed.

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Service Chiefs

The Service Chiefs are responsible for:

  1. approving specified ADF Cadets activities for the use of cadet firearms, in accordance with this policy
  2. approving a training syllabus, in accordance with this policy
  3. approving the use of firearms of other nations for approved international competitions, in accordance with this policy
  4. causing a cadet firearms record to be maintained, in respect of each member of their cadet organisation, in accordance with this policy
  5. directing their cadet organisations to implement the policy
  6. ensuring that their cadet organisation’s cadet firearms policy and procedures align with this policy
  7. resourcing the implementation of this policy within their respective Service’s cadet organisation.

Chief of Army (as Lead Capability Manager)

Chief of Army is the LCM for cadet firearms and is responsible for the procurement, disposal and servicing of cadet firearms, including publishing related policies and procedures in consultation with ADF Cadets and in particular taking the following action in accordance with this policy:

  1. approving firearms for use as cadet firearms
  2. providing guidance as to the types of activities for which the use of cadet firearms may be approved
  3. procuring cadet firearms, and specifying procedures for their procurement
  4. issuing instructions in respect of the servicing of cadet firearms
  5. issuing instructions in respect of the disposal of cadet firearms
  6. physical disposal of cadet firearms.

Head joint support services Division/commander adfcadets

Head Joint Support Services Division/Commander ADF Cadets is responsible for:

  1. supporting the Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC) in ensuring the implementation of this policy across the ADF Cadets
  2. monitoring the implementation and application of this policy
  3. conducting regular and comprehensive reviews of this policy.

Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves, the Commander Australian Army Cadets and the Director General Cadets – Air Force

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are responsible for ensuring that cadet firearms, associated equipment and ammunition held within their cadet organisations are procured, used, stored, transported, registered and serviced in accordance with this policy, and in particular for:

  1. approving cadet units to hold cadet firearms and innocuous Defence weapons
  2. approving the storage of cadet firearms at a non-Defence facility
  3. cancelling or suspending a cadet unit’s approval to hold cadet firearms
  4. supporting their respective Service Chief in ensuring the implementation of this policy in their respective Service’s cadet organisation
  5. supporting their respective Service Chief in ensuring that their cadet organisation procedures are consistent with this policy including:
    1. ensuring the security of cadet firearms and associated equipment
    2. ensuring that all cadet firearms and associated equipment held by their cadet unit are recorded on the FaR
    3. assessing whether a cadet displays the appropriate level of maturity to participate in an approved activity that involves the use of cadet firearms
    4. ensuring that cadet firearms held by their cadet unit are serviced annually
    5. holding of security keys
  6. ensuring that all ADF Cadets participants are aware of this policy and their obligations
  7. ensuring compliance with applicable publications such as local Range Standing Orders, LWP-G 7-3-0 and LWP-G 7-3-1
  8. liaising with the LCM in relation to their respective cadet organisation's procurement, disposal and servicing of cadet firearms
  9. developing their respective cadet organisation procedures relating to the implementation of, and compliance with, this policy, relevant legislation and LCM instructions
  10. ensuring that ADF Cadets participants with firearms-related responsibilities are familiar with, and act in accordance with, the security requirements contained in the DTAMM and the DSPF
  11. appointing a Firearms Administrator (FA), an FQM and an FM in accordance with this policy. 

Firearms Administrator

The FA within each Cadet Service HQ is responsible to DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS-AF as applicable for managing the use, storage, transport and registration of cadet firearms, associated equipment and ammunition on a national basis for their cadet organisation, and the conduct of all firearms assurance stocktakes.

Firearms QUALITY Manager/Firearms Manager

The FQM/FM is responsible to DGANCR, COMD AAC or DGCADETS‑AF as applicable, for the security, storage, transport, servicing and maintenance of cadet firearms, associated equipment and ammunition held by the cadet unit, and in particular:

  1. holding security keys in accordance with this policy
  2. completing the regular firearms assurance stocktake cycle at cadet unit level on CadetNet
  3. maintaining the cadet unit firearms records, including the FaR and ADF Cadets participants’ firearms training records.

Assistant Firearms Manager

The AFM assists and may deputise for the FQM/FM.

DELEGATIONS

Service Chiefs may delegate their functions under this policy.

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF may delegate their functions under this policy.

MONITORING

Joint Support Services Division is responsible for monitoring the operation of and compliance with this policy.

RELATED INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS

[1] Cadet Firearms are generally weapons that are commercially available to the public, subject to State and Territory laws and regulations.

[2] Defence Regulation 2013 Section 12 refers.

Chapter 6: ADF Cadets Booking of Training Areas and Other Locations

INTRODUCTION

ADF Cadets activities can occur in all environments (land, sea and air) throughout Australia. Activities that occur on Defence Training Areas (DTA), or use Defence facilities, or have the potential to require specific approvals or de-confliction with other Defence users, require a formalised booking process through Defence. Routine activities that occur within a community, using community spaces, facilities, or private property may not require booking through Defence, however may warrant notification to Defence. The booking of training areas and use of Defence facilities is an important part of the ongoing support provided by Defence to the ADF Cadets.

POLICY INTENT

The intent of this policy is to provide direction on when an ADF Cadets activity requires the location or facility to be booked through Defence and guidance on when the booking, notification and use of locations would not be booked through Defence.

This policy does not pertain to approved ceremonial events which are undertaken in public. This policy does not apply to airports, runways, or airspace controlled and booked through The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) or other non-Defence agencies. This policy does not apply to waterways, lakes, reservoirs or other bodies of water that are booked or controlled by non-Defence agencies.

POLICY PRACTICES AND MEASURES

The type and location of an activity will often determine whether a formal Defence booking process or clearances are required. ADF Cadets are encouraged to work closely with the Directorate of Operations and Training Area Management (DOTAM) and the Regional Training Area Managers (RTAM) and their staff when determining the booking requirements for an ADF Cadets activity. ADF Cadets are to provide copies of Annual Programs of Activities to DOTAM to assist in determining potential future booking requirements.

COMPLIANCE WITH REGULATIONS

The Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and the Director General Cadets – Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) must ensure ADF Cadets activities comply with the following requirements:

  1. the relevant Defence Manuals (in particular the Youth Policy Manual (YOUTHPOLMAN), Defence Security Principles Framework and the Defence Training Area Management Manual (DTAMM)
  2. the region-specific or local Standing Orders / Non-Defence Training Area (NDTA) Standard Operating Procedures applicable to the activity, training area or range on which the activity is to be undertaken
  3. the guidance, policies and signage requirements applicable for use of the site
  4. all reasonable direction provided by Defence personnel or the Owner/Manager of the facility or location
  5. for range practices:
    1. LWP-G 7-3-1 Australian Force Range Orders (Land) (LWP-G 7-3-1)
    2. (if applicable) YOUTHPOLMAN
    3. Authorised ADF procedures for the weapon(s) and practice being fired.
    4. Authorised ADF Cadets procedures for the firearms and practice being fired.

Activities to be booked through defence/DOTAM

DGANCR, COMD AAC, and DGCADETS-AF must ensure the following activity types and locations are booked through Defence (DOTAM or Defence facility managers):

  1. on Defence Training Areas (DTA) or Defence ranges (use DTA booking process)
  2. that involve firing of Defence weapons or cadets firearms including live firing on commercial/civilian live firing ranges or firing of Defence weapons using blank ammunition at any location) (use DTA or NDTA booking process as applicable)
  3. that involves the planned use of smoke grenades or signal flares used for training that is related to emergency situations such as casualty evacuations, helicopter pickups and non-warlike MLA. (use DTA or NDTA booking process as applicable)
  4. that use Defence ‘common areas’ or Defence common-use facilities (eg. base swimming pool, gymnasiums, obstacle courses, Defence ovals) (use relevant Defence base facility booking process)
  5. that have the likelihood to incur environmental or cultural impact/damage (eg. heavy vehicle use of formed tracks, clearing of vegetation, activities in delicate ecosystems, or in cultural heritage sites) (use NDTA booking process)
  6. where the site owner/manager has expressly asked for Defence to book the site (i.e. this may occur when the site owner requests the development of Environmental Clearance Certificates or other pre-activity site inspections for potential insurance purposes) (use NDTA booking process).

Activities to be advised to DOTAM

ADF Cadets activities may be undertaken on non-Defence sites, community facilities and grounds, or on private properties. DGANCR, COMD AAC, and DGCADETS-AF must ensure the following activity types and locations are to be advised to DOTAM in order to assist in de-conflicting other potential Defence users or to inform the public if necessary:

  1. large scale activities located on public properties, State forests, Crown/Commonwealth Land where the site owner/manager has not expressly asked for Defence to book the site (large scale activities are to be defined by the respective ADF Cadets parent Service in consultation with DOTAM)
  2. ADF Cadets archery practices conducted on Defence base common areas (eg. oval - noting the oval would have been booked through the Base Support Manager)
  3. activities that occur in locations commonly used by Defence (eg. waterways near Defence maritime bases/assets, airfields and drop zones used by Defence aviation assets).

Booking and notification processes for DTA and NDTA

DGANCR, COMD AAC, and DGCADETS-AF must ensure ADF Cadets Adults use the booking processes for DTA and NDTA in Annex A. Generally, arrangements for the booking of DTA and NDTA are to be in accordance with the DTAMM; however the following considerations apply:

  1. Enduring bookings are made through the Training Area Safety Management Information System (TASMIS).
  2. ADF Cadets units without TASMIS access, may use the DTA and NDTA booking forms available at Appendix 1 to Annex A, or via the Range Control Staff of the training area or range. These booking forms are to be submitted through the chain of command.
  3. Activities are not to proceed without a booking approved through TASMIS, or approved and/or confirmed by the Range Control Staff or NDTA Manager.
  4. Weapons Training Simulation Systems (WTSS) are to be booked through TASMIS.
  5. Bookings for non-DOTAM managed Defence training areas and ranges, i.e. single Service managed training area or range, are to be made through the operator of that range.

Common area and defence facility booking

The use of common areas and other Defence facilities are managed in accordance with the Framework for Enabling Defence Capability. Not all facilities are approved for use by ADF Cadets. Booking of all common areas on Defence bases and establishments must be done through the Base Support Manager. ADF Cadets are to refer to local base orders and policies for local booking processes.

Notification process

Activities not requiring booking through Defence may be notified to DOTAM by submitting a copy of the proposed Activity Instruction, Risk Management Plan or other document used by the ADF Cadets when gaining activity approval. This notification should be sent to the RTAM (listed in Annex B) as early as possible. Early notification will enable Defence to de-conflict or assist as necessary.

Privacy

Privacy matters relevant to this policy are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Annexes:

  1. Procedure for Booking Defence Training Areas and Non-Defence Training Areas.
  2. Regional Traning Area Managers/ADF Cadets Liaison Officer Contact Details.
Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 7: ADF Cadets Use of Defence Vehicles

INTRODUCTION

ADF Cadets utilises many forms of support to enable activities. A key component of the support Defence provides to the ADF Cadets is the use of Defence vehicles. The Defence Road Transport Manual (DRTM) applies to all Defence Personnel, ADF Cadet Adults, Officers of Cadets (OOC) and Instructors of Cadets (IOC) who are responsible for the management, supervision, control, operation and maintenance of Defence vehicles. DRTM is to be complied with when operating Defence vehicles.

POLICY INTENT

The intent of this policy is to outline the requirements for ADF Cadets to use Defence vehicles[1].

POLICY PRACTICES AND MEASURES

The Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), and the Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) must ensure:

  1. all vehicles used in ADF Cadets activities have the relevant current road, air or sea worthiness certification, registration and insurance
  2. all ADF Cadets Adults are provided with a copy of Annex 5A of the DRTM, which outlines their responsibilities when using Defence vehicles.

ADF Cadets Adults use of Defence vehicles is dependent upon their type of enrolment. Officers of Cadets (OOC) and Instructors of Cadets (IOC) may be granted authorisation to operate Defence vehicles. Defence Approved Helpers (DAH) must not operate a Defence vehicle; however may be authorised to tow Defence trailers with privately owned vehicles.

The Vehicle Authorisation and Task form (AD049), is the authorisation for drivers to operate a Defence vehicle. The driver must be in possession of an authorised AD049 prior to driving a Defence vehicle. Drivers must ensure that the AD049 is authorised by an appropriate Authorising Officer.

Authorising Officers must be trained and understand their obligations when signing the AD049 form allowing OOC and IOC to drive military vehicles. Personnel identified as Authorising Officers for the AD049 form must be promulgated in ADF Cadets routine orders or equivalent. It is the Authorising Officer’s responsibility to ensure that the driver has the appropriate licence or qualification to operate the vehicle type and that Section 1 of the AD049 form is completed correctly prior to driving a military vehicle.

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must ensure ADF Cadets Adults who are responsible for a Defence vehicle:

  1. hold the appropriate and valid State or Territory Driver licence and code for the vehicles they are required to operate during cadet activities
  2. have successfully completed familiarisation training in accordance with DRTM Chapter 11 prior to operating Defence Commercial Line (CL) Vehicles or towing CL Trailers. Familiarisation training, is not a Defence approved drivers course. Familiarisation training is not permitted on General Service (GS) Vehicles or Trailers
  3. only use vehicles on roads or formed roads appropriate for use in the ADF Cadets activity. Off-road use of Defence vehicles is not permitted. When there is a requirement for IOC or OOC to drive over difficult terrain they must undergo the appropriate Defence level difficult terrain training and assessment
  4. have a zero blood alcohol level when operating transport during cadet activities
  5. not consume any form of prohibited substance when operating any form of transport during cadet activities
  6. use all Defence vehicles in accordance with the DRTM.

The DRTM is applicable to all ADF Cadets Adults who are authorised to operate Defence vehicles and includes the following:

  1. Defence plated CL vehicles
  2. Defence hired civilian vehicles
  3. GS vehicles, limited to LR2 and MR2 variants, operator must have completed Defence approved drivers course
  4. Defence trailers with both Defence and State/Territory plates
  5. use of privately owned vehicles to tow Defence trailers, both Defence and State/Territory plates
  6. additional ancillary equipment is not to be operated i.e. cranes, dump hoist, winches: unless sessioned exported training has been authorised.

Prior to operating a Defence vehicle the driver should be conversant with, but not limited to:

  1. an introductory briefing of the DRTM and Defence Road Transport Exemption Framework and jurisdictional permits if required
  2. daily servicing requirements
  3. operation and location of wheel changing equipment
  4. use of a Defence fuel card
  5. vehicle capacity and load restraint guide. There is to be no unrestrained movement of cadets or other personnel on public roads.

In the event that a Defence vehicle is not available, the towing of Defence owned trailers behind privately owned and plated motor vehicles is permissible in accordance with the ADF Cadets Defence Vehicle Usage Fact Sheet at Annex A. The ADF Cadets Defence Vehicle Usage Acknowledgement is at Annex B.

ADF Cadets Adults who have previously been granted a Defence licence following completion of an endorsed Defence vehicle training course do not require any further Defence training to drive the class of Defence vehicle they are qualified to operate, but need to ensure that their licence is in date and they are qualified and current to operate. A record or licence register is to be managed by the respective Cadet Service Headquarters (HQ).

Navy is acknowledged as providing policy guidance and standards for watercraft and water based cadet activities. All Defence owned and leased watercraft used by ADF Cadets must be used in accordance with Directives and Policy issued by the Chief of Navy.

Army is acknowledged as providing policy guidance and standards for vehicles used during cadet activities. All Defence vehicles owned and leased designed to transport freight and/or passengers including trailers must be operated in accordance with the DRTM.

Air Force is acknowledged as providing policy guidance and standards for aircraft and cadet flying activities. All Defence owned and leased aircraft must be used in accordance with directives and policy issued by the Chief of Air Force.

Defence owned, hired and leased Defence vehicles used during cadet activities to transport ADF Cadets participants and/or unit resources must not be driven by cadets, or community members who are not OOC/IOC.

Personal information may be collected for the purpose of ensuring compliance with the requirements of this policy. Personal information collected on ADF Cadets Adults driving qualifications and licences in accordance with the DRTM will only be accessed by Defence members and ADF Cadets Adults to determine the suitability of an OOC, IOC or DAH to operate road transport during cadet activities.

Privacy

Privacy matters relevant to this policy are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Annexes:

  1. ADF Cadets Defence Vehicle Usage Fact Sheet
  2. ADF Cadets Defence Vehicle Usage Acknowledgement
Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)


[1] Licensing:
Defence has tried to align Defence and Civilian licencing requirements.
“C” = car - up to 4.5 tonne
“LR” – Light Rigid - 4.5 tonne but less than 8 tonne
“MR” – Medium Rigid – 2 axle vehicle that is heavy than 8 tonne
“HR” – Heavy Rigid – no axle limit, heavy than 8 tonne
“HC” – Heavy Combination – Prime mover with semi-trailer combination
Defence then has a further requirements to identify and operate Commercial Line (CL, white fleet, brought of the shelf) vehicles, General Service (GS, green fleet/ Army special purpose trucks) or buses. Defence denotes this by using a number.
1 is used to identify Commercial Line vehicle’s
2 is used to identify General Service (Army/green fleet vehicles)
3 is used to identify it is a bus

Chapter 8 : Adf Cadets Adult Learning Domain Common Elements

INTRODUCTION

Effective learning and development (L&D) provides ADF Cadets Adults[1] with the knowledge and skills necessary to become safe and effective adult members of their respective cadet organisations. Common L&D requirements for ADF Cadets Adults are managed by the Lead Enabling Manager-Training (LEM-T).

The ADF Cadets youth development program strives to build resilience, life-skills and self-confidence, underpinned by a sense of service to others and in an environment that reflects each Cadet Organisation’s parent Service and Defence’s values.

POLICY INTENT

This policy outlines the minimum requirements for the appropriate analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation of adult L&D across all elements of the ADF Cadets adult learning domain common elements.

NATIONAL PRINCIPLES FOR CHILD SAFE ORGANISATIONS

This policy is consistent with:

  1. Principle 7: Staff and volunteers are equipped with the knowledge, skills and awareness to keep children and young people safe through ongoing education and training.

Principle 1

  • The Adult Learning Domain Common Elements (ALDCE) Architecture articulates the common L&D requirements for ADF Cadets Adults. This includes the requirements for adherence to the Defence Youth Safety Framework (DYSF).
  • The health, protection and well-being of ADF Cadets Youth and Adults is the highest priority when planning and conducting activities. ADF Cadets Adults L&D is delivered to enable adults to attain appropriate skills, knowledge and personal behaviours to conduct ADF Cadets activities in a manner that is consistent with DYSF requirements and legislative workplace health and safety requirements.
  • All common ADF Cadets Adults L&D must be developed and conducted in a manner consistent with State/Territory and Commonwealth legislation, relevant Defence and ADF Cadets policies, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the United Nations Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict. 

Principle 2

  • Common L&D requirements for ADF Cadets Adults in the ALDCE are aligned to the Systems Approach to Defence Learning (SADL).
  • The ALDCE Implementation requirements (Annex A), and ALDCE Architecture (Annex B) were developed in accordance with and are aligned to the SADL. Subordinate common L&D activities must be similarly aligned.
  • ADF Cadets Adults L&D is incremental, increasing in complexity and detail to match increasingly complex ADF Cadets Adults tasks and responsibilities. Assignment of tasks and responsibilities to ADF Cadets Adults is based on their prior completion of appropriate L&D activities. Authorisation to conduct ADF Cadets tasks is aligned to a ‘trained-accomplished-authorised’ approach that ensures ADF Cadets Adults are equipped for safe and appropriate interactions with their peers, ADF Cadets Youth, members of the ADF and Australian Public Service, parents/carers or guardians and the community.

Principle 3

  • Common L&D requirements are aligned to the ADF Cadets vision as a leading youth development organisation.
  • All common ADF Cadets Adults L&D is developed and conducted with the best interests and well-being (physical, psychological and emotional) of ADF Cadets Youth as the primary consideration.
  • ADF Cadets Adults L&D equips adults to provide a curriculum to ADF Cadets Youth that develops physical, emotional, intellectual, and moral dimensions. The focus is on guiding cadets to develop into resilient, confident, and competent community-minded adults who are effective community members and leaders.

Principle 4

  • The ALDCE and the requirements of the DYSF are transparent
  • Information on the conduct of common ADF Cadets Adults L&D within the ADF Cadets is freely available to the public and both prospective and current members of ADF Cadets to enable ‘informed consent’ for participation.
ADULT LEARNING DOMAIN COMMON ELEMENTS

The ALDCE describes the common L&D requirements for ADF Cadets Adults and establishes the minimum requirements. Respective Cadet Organisations may implement additional L&D to meet their respective needs. Such L&D is to be compliant with the Policy Principles.

ACCOUNTABILITIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

COMD AAC - LEM-T is accountable to Head Joint Support Services Division / Commander ADF Cadets for:

  1. development and maintenance of a Common L&D architecture for ADF Cadets Adults
  2. development and maintenance of an LEM-T Assurance Framework.

The ADF Cadets Learning Advisory Group (ADF Cadets LAG) is responsible for the oversight and strategic management of ADF Cadets Adults common L&D.

LEM-T chairs the ADF Cadets LAG. Membership of the ADF Cadets LAG consists of Director General Australian Navy Cadets, Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), Director General Cadets–Air Force and Director Youth.

The ADF Cadets LAG members may delegate their functions under this policy.

The ADF Cadets Training Review Board (TRB) implements the strategic direction set by ADF Cadets LAG. TRB membership includes COL/EL2 LEM-T (Chair) and representatives from the LEM-T team, Cadet Branches and Youth Directorate.

The Directors General Cadets and COMD AAC are responsible for implementing, monitoring and reporting on all aspects of overarching assurance functions within their respective ADF Cadets organisations. Including but not limited to:

  1. the development and implementation of L&D packages and supporting material, including amendments specific to the maritime, land and air domains
  2. undertaking analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation of L&D programs within their organisation
  3. ensuring all packages, continuation or refresher L&D is consistent with the ALDCE and LEM-T guidance documents
  4. managing the timing, level and delivery of education and training programs specific to members’ roles, levels, tasks and responsibilities.
RECORD MANAGEMENT

The Directors General Cadets and Commander AAC are responsible for ensuring timely and accurate management of relevant L&D records in CadetNet or approved ADF Cadets system/tool. ADF Cadets Adults L&D accomplishments are an essential component of ensuring that only trained, accomplished, authorised ADF Cadets Adults participate in and conduct ADF Cadets activities for ADF Cadets Youth.

PRIVACY

All information collected in relation to Working with Children Checks must be treated as confidential and managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Annexes:

  1. Adult Learning Domain Common Elements (ALDCE) Implementation Requirements
  2. Adult Learning Domain Common Elements (ALDCE) Architecture
Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

FOOTNOTES

[1] ADF Cadets Adults includes Officers of Cadets, Instructors of Cadets and Defence Approved Helpers

Chapter 9: Adf Cadets Cadet Learning Domain Common Elements

INTRODUCTION

The ADF Cadets youth development program reflects Defence Values and the character of each Cadet Organisation’s parent Service. It aims to build resilience, life-skills and self-confidence, underpinned by a sense of service to others and in an environment that draws on the military ethos and experience of Defence and the parent Services.

The ADF Cadets youth development program is delivered through learning and development (L&D) which provides cadets the opportunity to develop their character, positive personal behaviours and attitudes across physical, emotional, cognitive, social and moral dimensions. Effective L&D teaches the value of both participation and achievement, supporting cadets to grow and mature at their own pace. Effective L&D may occur in multiple environments, including programmed ADF Cadets exercises and activities, deliberate first-hand and experiential L&D activities and vicarious learning through observed activities.

Common L&D requirements for ADF Cadets Youth are managed by the Lead Enabling Manager-Training (LEM-T).

POLICY INTENT

This policy outlines the minimum requirements for the appropriate analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation of ADF Cadets Youth L&D across all elements of the ADF Cadets Cadet Learning Domain Common Elements (CLDCE).

NATIONAL PRINCIPLES FOR CHILD SAFE ORGANISATIONS

This policy is consistent with:

  1. Principle 7: Staff and volunteers are equipped with the knowledge, skills and awareness to keep children and young people safe through ongoing education and training.
POLICY PRINCIPLES

Principle 1

  • The CLDCE Architecture articulates the common (L&D) requirements for ADF Cadets Youth. This includes the requirements for adherence to the Defence Youth Safety Framework (DYSF).
  • The health, protection and wellbeing of ADF Cadets Youth and Adults is the highest priority when planning and conducting activities. ADF Cadets Youth L&D is delivered to enable cadets to attain appropriate attitudes, knowledge, and personal behaviours to participate in ADF Cadets activities in a manner that is consistent with DYSF requirements and legislative workplace health and safety requirements.
  • All common ADF Cadets Youth L&D must be developed and conducted in a manner consistent with State/Territory and Commonwealth legislation, relevant Defence and ADF Cadets policies, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the United Nations Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict.

Principle 2

  • Common L&D requirements for ADF Cadets Youth in the CLDCE are aligned to the Systems Approach to Defence Learning (SADL) and pedagogic systems.
  • The CLDCE Implementation requirements (Annex A) and CLDCE Architecture (Annex B) are developed in accordance with and are aligned to the SADL. The CLDCE is aligned to pedagogic principles, focused on delivering effective L&D to youth. Subordinate common and Single Service L&D activities must be similarly aligned.
  • ADF Cadets Youth L&D is incremental, increasing in complexity and detail to match increasing individual maturity and development across intellectual, cognitive, emotional, social and physical dimensions.
  • Commander ADF Cadets, Director General Australian Navy Cadets (DGANC), Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and Director General Cadets–Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) may prescribe activities that require ADF Cadets Youth to attain specific accomplishments prior to conducting the activity. Permission to conduct specific activities or assignment of peer-leadership or peer-level-responsibilities to ADF Cadets Youth is based on their prior completion of appropriate L&D activities and demonstration that they have the appropriate skills, knowledge and behaviours. Authorisation to conduct prescribed ADF Cadets tasks is aligned to a ‘trained-accomplished-authorised’ approach that ensures cadets are equipped for safe and appropriate interactions with their peers, ADF Cadets Adults, members of the ADF and Australian Public Service, parents/carers or guardians and the community.

Principle 3

  • Common L&D requirements are aligned to the ADF Cadets vision as a leading youth development organisation.
  •  All common ADF Cadets Youth L&D is developed and conducted with the best interests and well-being (physical, psychological and emotional) of ADF Cadets Youth as the primary consideration.
  • ADF Cadets Youth L&D equips them to engage to their full potential in the ADF Cadets program. The focus is to develop cadets into resilient, confident and competent community-minded adults who are effective community members and leaders.

Principle 4

  • The CLDCE and the requirements of the DYSF are transparent.
  • Information on the conduct of common ADF Cadets Youth L&D within the ADF Cadets is freely available to the public and both prospective and current members of ADF Cadets to enable ‘informed consent’ for participation.
CADET LEARNING DOMAIN COMMON ELEMENTS

The CLDCE describes the Common L&D requirements for ADF Cadets Youth and establishes the recommended requirements. Respective Cadet Organisations may implement additional L&D to meet their respective needs. Such L&D is to be compliant with the Policy Principles.

ACCOUNTABILITIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

COMD AAC - LEM-T is accountable to Head Joint Support Services Division / Commander ADF Cadets for:

  1. development and maintenance of a common L&D architecture for ADF Cadets Youth
  2. development and maintenance of an LEM-T Assurance Framework.

The ADF Cadets Learning Advisory Group (ADF Cadets LAG) is responsible for the oversight and strategic management of ADF Cadets Youth common L&D.

LEM-T chairs the ADF Cadets LAG. Membership of the ADF Cadets LAG consists of DGANC, COMD AAC, DGCADETS-AF and Director Youth.

The ADF Cadets LAG members may delegate their functions under this policy.

The ADF Cadets Training Review Board (TRB) implements the strategic direction set by ADF Cadets LAG. TRB membership includes COL/EL2 LEM-T (Chair) and representatives from the LEM-T team, Cadet Branches and Youth Directorate.

The Directors General Cadets and Commander AAC are responsible for implementing, monitoring and reporting on all aspects of overarching assurance functions within their respective ADF Cadets organisations. Including but not limited to:

  1. the development and implementation of L&D packages and supporting material, including amendments specific to the maritime, land and air domains
  2. undertaking analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation of L&D programs within their organisation
  3. ensuring all packages, continuation or refresher L&D is consistent with the CLDCE and LEM-T guidance documents
  4. managing the timing, level and delivery of education and training programs specific to members’ roles, levels, tasks and responsibilities.
RECORD MANAGEMENT

The Directors General Cadets and Commander AAC are responsible for ensuring timely and accurate management of relevant L&D records in CadetNet or approved ADF Cadets system/tool. Cadet L&D accomplishments are an essential component of ensuring that only trained, accomplished, authorised cadets participate in and conduct prescribed ADF Cadets activities.

PRIVACY

All information collected in relation to Working with Children Checks must be treated as confidential and managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Annexes:

  1. Cadet Learning Domain Common Elements (CLDCE) Implementation Requirements
  2. Cadet Learning Domain Common Elements (CLDCE) Architecture
Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 1: AD Cadets Security and SAFEBASE

INTRODUCTION

Defence has a duty of care to ensure that all ADF Cadets activities are undertaken in a safe and secure manner using appropriate Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) principles and protective security measures which are proportionate to the risks inherent in the various aspects of the ADF Cadets programs.

The safety and wellbeing of all ADF Cadets participants (both adults and youth) is paramount; therefore Defence, in conjunction with the ADF Cadets programs, will assist cadet units to undertake activities that are safe and secure, and provide a positive experience for all participants.

In all activities undertaken by ADF Cadets units, commanders, managers and supervisor must conduct an activity risk assessment to be satisfied that potential WHS risks are identified, minimised, eliminated or controlled, so far as reasonably practicable, before approval to proceed with the activity is obtained. In a similar manner, commanders, managers and supervisors must ensure that all security risks have been identified, minimised, eliminated or controlled, so far as reasonably practicable, and that ADF Cadets activities are being conducted in a secure and protected environment.

POLICY INTENT

The purpose of this policy is to outline the protective security requirements associated with ADF Cadets activities and provide guidance on the actions to be taken by ADF Cadets programs under the SAFEBASE security alert system.

PROTECTIVE SECURITY MEASURES

All ADF Cadets activities undertaken within Defence bases, establishments and Defence owned or leased facilities are to comply with the protective security measures detailed in the Defence Security Principles Framework (DSPF). Activities undertaken at school based cadet units or community facilities free of charge or leased by cadet support committees are also to comply with the DSPF where possible.

Security management decisions are to be based on the security risks associated with ADF Cadets activities and the threat levels promulgated by the Defence Chief Security Officer under the SAFEBASE security alert system.

To ensure that security risks are identified and appropriately mitigated, planning for ADF Cadets activities must include a security risk assessment as a component of the overall activity risk assessment. Guidance on the factors to be considered in conducting a security risk assessments is shown at Annex A.

Planning for annual cadet training activities including public events, field exercises, shooting competitions, regattas and flight camps is also to include consideration of civilian emergency response arrangements in addition to the security risk assessment.

Approval for all ADF Cadets activities must be obtained from the Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and the Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) or their delegates, as appropriate. This should include the approval of a security risk assessment for each cadet activity conducted.

All ADF Cadets participants are to be aware of, and capable of adopting the protective security measures appropriate to the location and nature of their activities as defined in the DSPF.

Security Training

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure all ADF Cadets participants complete appropriate security awareness training and annual refresher training as defined by the ADF Cadets Headquarters.

The currency of security awareness training for each ADF Cadets unit is to be reported by DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF to the Head of Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD) and the Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC) no less than annually.

Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Security

HJSSD is responsible for providing ADF Cadets units with appropriate and effective ICT systems and must ensure that ICT systems provided to ADF Cadets maintain a current security accreditation rating as assessed by the Chief Information Officer Group (CIOG).

HJSSD is to advise CIOG of relevant changes to the CadetNet Enterprise Application in accordance with the Information Security Manual (ISM).

Security Reporting Obligations

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure that ADF Cadets participants within their respective programs undertake contact reporting and security incident reporting in accordance with the DSPF.

Identification, Search and Seizure Regimes

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure ADF Cadets participants comply with the identification, search and seizure regimes when necessary, as authorised by the appropriate Defence delegate, federal police or government agency.

Emergency and Lockdown

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure that emergency and lockdown procedures within each of their ADF Cadets units are reviewed and exercised in accordance with single Service headquarters reporting requirements.

Wearing of Cadet Uniforms in Public

On occasions where there is a heightened Defence security threat, ADF members are advised to be situationally aware of their surroundings and to exercise greater caution in relation to where and when they wear uniform in public. The same cautionary advice applies to ADF Cadets participants as they are perceived to be directly associated with the ADF by many members of the public.

ADF Cadets participants are to adhere to the direction provided by DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF or their delegates, as appropriate, regarding where and when they are to wear ADF Cadets uniform in public. The risks associated with the wearing of cadet uniforms in public are to be identified in each ADF Cadets security risk assessment and mitigated, so far as reasonably practicable.

Physical Security

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are responsible for assigning the overall physical security responsibilities for their respective cadet units and mitigating any specific physical security risks, so far as reasonably practical.

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure that a review of the physical security arrangements for each ADF Cadets unit is undertaken no less than annually.

The status of the physical security arrangements for each ADF Cadets unit is to be reported to the relevant Service headquarters in accordance with single Service reporting requirements.

Security of Defence Weapons and ADF Cadet Firearms

The security of Defence Weapons, ADF Cadets firearms, associated equipment and controlled repair parts (including storage and transport) is to be undertaken in accordance with the policies contained in Section 3, Chapter 4 and Chapter 5.

Storage of items supplied by the commonwealth

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure all ADF Cadets units have appropriate facilities and procedures in place for the storage of valuable and attractive stores and equipment, and hazardous or dangerous goods which have been supplied by the Commonwealth.

All valuable and attractive stores and equipment, and hazardous or dangerous goods are to be stored in accordance with Commonwealth and Defence policies to prevent unauthorised use or theft, and are not to be issued to cadet units unless adequate storage facilities are available, and appropriate physical security arrangements are in place.

Unauthorised use, theft of or damage to valuable and attractive stores and equipment, and hazardous or dangerous goods, is to be promptly reported in accordance with the DSPF.

Access Controls

Defence is required to establish access control points and positively identify individuals before granting access to an area on Defence owned or leased facilities that have not been designated for public use. Only people whose identity has been verified and who have an appropriate security clearance or authority, or an accepted reason for seeking entry, can be permitted to access Defence facilities, assets and information.

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure that ADF Cadets participants comply with the requirements of access control points on Defence owned or leased facilities. For school based cadet units or community facilities, either leased by cadet support committees or provided free of charge where access points can or have been established, units are to comply with this direction as far as reasonably practicable.

ADF Cadets units are to provide the Senior Australian Defence Force Officer (SADFO) and the Base Security Manager (BSM) of Defence bases with identity information associated with their cadet participants, to allow identity verification and access to Defence facilities.

Where there is one single entry point to an ADF Cadets unit, access points are to be supervised/manned when opened, and locked during parade nights, so far as reasonably practicable and without risk to personal safety or evacuation measures in the event of an emergency.

Identity Cards

ADF Cadets participants are to have an appropriate form of identification to enable access to the Defence facilities that they utilise. This is normally a Defence Common Access Card (DCAC) or a Cadets Identity Card (CIC). For the purposes of this policy the collective term ‘identity card’ is used to describe either.

Identity cards must only be used to access Defence owned or leased facilities which ADF Cadets participants have a legitimate need to access in relation to ADF Cadets activities. Identity cards issued to cadet participants do not grant the holder access to any additional Defence owned or leased facilities, assets or information without authorisation from the appropriate Defence delegate.

Defence personnel within ADF Cadets programs may be granted access to those Defence owned or leased facilities which they have a legitimate need to access in the performance of their duties in relation to ADF Cadets activities by the respective SADFO or BSM.

ADF Cadets are to comply with the designated access control arrangements of their respective ADF Cadets units and the access control arrangements of other ADF Cadets units that they may visit as part of their cadet activities.

HJSSD is responsible for providing financial support to fund the production of the CIC.

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are responsible for maintaining the accuracy and currency of identity information related to their cadet participants for the production and use of identity cards.

Annual Review

To reduce the security risks associated with ADF Cadets activities, DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF or their delegates, are to undertake an annual review of the protective security measures for each of the cadets units within their respective cadet programs to ensure the appropriate protective security and access control measures are in place, including the provision of identity information associated with adults and youth participants. These annual reviews are to be conducted in consultation with the SADFO or BSM of each Defence base or establishment as appropriate, and are to be reported to the Joint Cadet Executive Board.

SAFEBASE SECURITY ALERT SYSTEM

Introduction

The Defence SAFEBASE security alert system is designed to communicate threats of violence against Defence bases, sites and establishments, and is underpinned by effective security planning. Acts of violence from terrorism, political or issue-motivated groups and maverick individuals, pose a threat to Defence personnel and assets. It is therefore important that those in charge of Defence bases, sites and establishments be kept informed of expected threats to support their decision-making in relation to the safety and security of their personnel and assets.

The SAFEBASE security alert system consists of three levels:

  1. Aware (yellow): Threat advice of a violent act against Defence bases is generalised. No specific time or location of a threat is notified. Personnel should be aware of their security responsibilities and expect Defence business to continue as normal.
  2. Alert (orange): Threat advice indicates a specific risk and timeframe for a violent act against a particular Defence base or bases. Personnel should expect increased protective security measures and greater restrictions on Defence business.
  3. Act (red): Threat advice indicates a violent act is either imminent or happening on a particular Defence base. Personnel should exercise extreme caution and follow emergency procedures.

Changes to SAFEBASE security alert levels may apply locally (to a single base), regionally (to a number of bases in a defined geographic region) or nationally (Defence-wide) and are employed as an agile risk mitigation method that contributes to protecting Defence personnel and assets.

Decisions to raise the alert level from ‘Aware’ to ‘Alert’ are based on credible threat intelligence that indicates a base may be the target of a violent act which is expected within a specific timeframe (for example, within a week or a month).

Decisions to raise the alert level to ‘Act’ are again based on credible threat intelligence that indicates a violent act is imminent or is currently happening on a Defence base. The ‘Act’ SAFEBASE level is maintained for as long as the violent act is expected to be imminent or is underway, and is expected to be sustained for no longer than 48 hours.

Roles and Responsibilities

Decisions on SAFEBASE alert levels are threat-based and informed by consultation with intelligence and law enforcement agencies, Headquarters Joint Operations Command (HQJOC), and local base authorities.

The Chief Security Officer, or an approved delegate, is authorised to set the SAFEBASE alert level locally, regionally or nationally in response to threat and risk assessments.

SADFOs are authorised to set the SAFEBASE alert level at their local base in response to assessed security threats and risk advice. Upon raising the SAFEBASE status to ‘Alert’ level, the SADFO takes command of the base and activates additional protective security measures in accordance with the Base Security Plan.

SADFOs and BSMs are responsible for communicating SAFEBASE alert levels to personnel on their base, to warn them of the threat, as well as providing information on security plans and procedures. Affected bases then operate at higher security levels with expected limitations on routine operations and day-to-day business.

Chief of Army has appointed COMD AAC to the role of SADFO for AAC units which are not on Defence sites with the authority to issue commands and general instructions to AAC units if warranted and in accordance with CA Directive 08/2020 Appointment of Senior Australian Defence Force Officers (SADFO) and Acting Senior Australian Defence Force Officers (A/SADFO) for Army Bases and Army Area Representatives (AAR).

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF or their delegates, are responsible for liaising with the SADFOs and BSMs to enable appropriate notification of any change in SAFEBASE status affecting local ADF Cadets units.

Application of Safebase Security Alert levels

SAFEBASE security alert levels apply to all ADF Cadets units that parade at Defence owned or leased facilities. ADF Cadets units that parade at schools or community-based facilities are also to implement the security requirements of the SAFEBASE security alert system, so far as reasonably practicable.

DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF are to ensure that ADF Cadets units within their respective programs comply with the designated SAFEBASE security alert levels and the additional protective security measures promulgated by the base SADFO and BSM.

When a decision is made to raise the SAFEBASE security level from ‘Aware’ to ‘Alert’ at a Defence owned or leased facility, the base would likely move to a partial lockdown and only essential personnel would be permitted access to the facility. Under these circumstances, DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF or their delegates, should direct all ADF Cadets activities at that particular facility to cease until the SAFEBASE security level reverts to ‘Aware’.

If a decision is made to raise the SAFEBASE security level to ‘Act’ at a Defence owned or leased facility, the base would move to a full lockdown and ADF Cadets would not be permitted access to the facility until the SAFEBASE security level reverts to ‘Aware’.

Privacy

Privacy matters relevant to this policy are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Annex:

  1. Guide to Security Risk Assessments
Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 2: ADF Cadets Complaint Resolution

INTRODUCTION

The ADF Cadets - Australian Navy Cadets (ANC); Australian Army Cadets (AAC) and the Australian Air Force Cadets (AAFC) aim to deliver safe and positive youth experiences. The prompt and effective management of complaints through a responsive, transparent and fair complaints process is an important component of delivering a safe program within which all feel respected, valued and safe.

Complaints can be a valuable feed-back mechanism to help improve the ADF Cadets. An effective and trusted complaints process can also prevent a minor problem or dispute escalating to a serious issue. As such the ADF Cadets must have an effective system for handling complaints, and create a culture where complaints are taken seriously and resolved in a timely manner.

ADF Cadets Adults and Youth are not members of the ADF and are therefore not required to comply with the Complaints and Resolution Manual (CARM). Recognising their volunteer status, ADF Cadets need to establish clear guidance for the management of complaints that does not simply mirror the CARM. The principles outlined within the Commonwealth Ombudsman - Better Practice Guide to Complaint Handling, have therefore been referenced as suitable guidance in the development of this policy.

POLICY INTENT

The intent of this policy is to provide guidance to the Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), and the Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) to support the development and implementation of an effective complaints management process for cadets and adults.

POLICY PRACTICES AND MEASURES

If there is a belief that a young person is in immediate danger, police are to be called immediately on 000.

A complaint is an expression of dissatisfaction made with the expectation that the cause of the dissatisfaction will be rectified as quickly as possible. The ADF Cadets recognise that everyone has the right to make a complaint about any element of their respective Service programs. However, this right should also be balanced with personal responsibilities. Complainants have responsibilities to attempt to resolve interpersonal issues at the lowest level, before raising complaints and participating in the resolution process.

When responding to an unacceptable behaviour complaint, ADF Cadets must ensure that the complaint is managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3.

Complaint handling principles

The complaint handling principles to be considered when developing an effective complaints management process are as follows:

  1. Fairness. The ADF Cadets address each complaint with integrity and in an equitable, objective and unbiased manner:
    1. All complaints are taken seriously. Complaints are handled respectfully, sympathetically, confidentially (where applicable) and promptly. ADF Cadets acknowledges and respects the rights of participants, to lodge complaints directly with external bodies.
    2. ADF Cadets are to ensure information about a complaint is only provided to those who need to know about it, in order for the complaint to be actioned properly. All parties to a complaint have a right to expect their privacy will be respected.
    3. All parties to a complaint are to be accorded protection against unfair repercussions or victimisation and are to be provided with appropriate support.
    4. Vexatious and malicious complaints. Complainants should be made aware that vexatious and malicious complaints constitute unacceptable behaviour, and are a breach of the Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct (Adult) or Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct (Youth). A complaint is considered to be vexatious if it is an abuse of the complaint process, if there are no reasonable grounds for the complaint, or the purpose of the complaint is to harass, annoy, delay or cause detriment.
    5. A complaint that is found to be unsubstantiated does not necessarily constitute a vexatious complaint. It may have been made in good faith but based on incorrect information or a misunderstanding, and/or the evidence to substantiate the complaint may simply not have been verified.
  2. Accessibility. The ADF Cadets ensure information about the complaints process is easily understood and widely promulgated through:
    1. every ADF Cadets participant understanding the complaints process in order to be able to participate in it if required, including those who have to resolve complaints
    2. parents and guardians being provided with information about complaint handling and resolution
    3. parties to a complaint being aware of their rights and their responsibilities
    4. a complainant being aware they have the responsibility to attempt, where appropriate, to resolve disputes or interpersonal issues by direct discussion with the other party or parties; and demonstrate willingness to participate in the resolution process, in good faith and with the intention of resolution - not retribution
    5. complainants, particularly youth, being aware they are to be offered appropriate support and assistance. This includes an explanation of the process that will be followed to resolve the complaint.
  3. Responsiveness. The ADF Cadets assess and prioritise complaints in accordance with the seriousness of the issue raised noting the following:
    1. ADF Cadets programs must ensure timely and effective remedial action is taken with due consideration to all parties.
    2. Resolution of complaints does not necessarily mean that the decision satisfies either the complainant or the respondent.
  4. Efficiency. All complaints should be resolved in a timely manner and at the lowest appropriate level noting the following:
    1. Complaints are to be resolved at the lowest possible level to achieve an appropriate resolution in the shortest possible timeframe.
    2. ADF Cadets Adults who receive a complaint that is within their authority and can be resolved appropriately by them (or at their level) should do so as a matter of course. Unnecessary referral of complaints to a higher authority often delays resolution, potentially leading to further dissatisfaction.
  5. Integration – The ADF Cadets analyse complaint data to inform organisational learning noting the following:
    1. All complaints are to be managed through to a resolution.
    2. Management of complaints should include the identification of ways to improve or mitigate against similar issues occurring in the future. Lessons learnt must be communicated.
    3. Feedback on making a complaint, is encouraged in order to inform learning and improvement of the complaints process.

Record Keeping. Where the nature of the complaint requires it to be referred to another agency for investigation, this is to be clearly recorded and managed in accordance with the requirements of the ADF Cadets Records Management Policy (refer Section 4 Chapter 3)

Privacy

It is likely that personal information will be collected, stored, used and disclosed for the purposes of resolving a complaint. This information is to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 3: ADF Cadets Records Management

INTRODUCTION

The Defence Records Management Policy (DRMP) outlines the requirements that Defence must comply with as a Commonwealth agency, to fulfil its lawful obligations under the Archives Act 1983. The DRMP establishes clear principles for records management within Defence and applies to all records created as part of Defence decision-making and business activities.

The content of the DRMP is consistent with the guidance provided by the National Archives of Australia (NAA) and incorporates relevant Australian and international standards for records and document management, to ensure alignment with recognised best practices.

The legal instrument issued by the NAA which outlines the mandatory requirements of Australian Government agencies for retaining, transferring or disposing of records is called a Records Authority. A Records Authority contains information about the classes of records that must be retained, how long they must be retained, and other conditions for the disposal of records. To meet the NAA’s records disposal requirements and to ensure there is adequate coverage for the records created during the conduct of Defence business, several subject-based Records Authorities have been established within the Defence organisation, including a subject-based records authority for Defence Youth and Cadets.[1]

The Defence Youth and Cadets Records Authority focuses on the core business of Defence when managing contact, engagement and interaction with youth in a variety of ways, both in Australia and overseas. This involvement with youths is acknowledged as a unique arrangement within Defence, and accordingly in the context of the administration of all related records. Not only are ADF and APS personnel directly involved, but also other stakeholders are considered to hold direct involvement; such as approved volunteer non-Defence adults and youths who participate in ADF Cadets programs.

In addition to the requirements of the Archives Act 1983, the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse delivered its final report in December 2017 and recommended that all institutions that engage in child‑related work should implement high-level recordkeeping principles in response to the risk of child sexual abuse occurring within the institution.

The Royal Commission recommended, amongst other things, that full and accurate records should be created and maintained for all incidents, responses and decisions affecting child safety and wellbeing, including child sexual abuse, and that records should only be disposed of in accordance with law or policy.

Key observations from the Royal Commission were that the rights of individuals to access records about themselves should be recognised to the fullest extent, and that institutions must dedicate time and resources to creating and managing records.

Defence has a requirement to manage its records in a way that complies with legislation, standards and government policy; provides for public accountability; supports decision-making, and preserves corporate memory and historical information. To meet this requirement, all Defence records must be created, captured and controlled, made accessible and disclosed when required, and be retained and disposed of in accordance with the principles in the DRMP.

The DRMP sets the standards for Defence to achieve compliance with the Archives Act 1983 and the recommendations of the Royal Commission, and directs Defence personnel, including those involved with ADF Cadets programs to manage their obligations when creating, capturing, controlling, accessing and disposing of Defence records.

POLICY INTENT

The purpose of this policy is to outline the records management practices required to ensure that complete and accurate records of all ADF Cadets activities and decisions are created, captured, controlled, accessed and disposed of appropriately and in accordance with the DRMP.

POLICY PRACTICES AND MEASURES

Defence Records

A Defence record is any document or object, in any form, that contains information relating to Defence activities that is created, captured, managed or stored by Defence personnel or external service providers in order to provide evidence of that activity.

Records are not restricted by format and include structured and semi-structured data, raw and processed data, documents, images, audio and visual digital media, handheld imagery and motion imagery, emails, web pages, social media posts, medical documentation and imagery, technical drawings and physical objects (such as art work and artefacts).

Records constitute the ‘memory’ of Defence by documenting decisions, actions, events, policies and processes. As such, records strengthen current and future decision making capability, inform stakeholders, and support litigation and regulatory compliance. To achieve these outcomes, records must be created, managed, retained, accessible and appropriately preserved and/or destroyed.

Material which is not a record

A document or object is not a record if it does not relate to Defence activities, has no unique content or is only momentarily useful. Documents or objects relating to Defence activity are not records if they are:

  1. copies of blank forms, templates, or form letters
  2. copies of material retained for convenience or reference purposes only
  3. facilitative, transitory or short-term items
  4. rough working papers
  5. drafts not intended for further use or reference whether in paper or electronic form, including documents that have minor edits for grammar and spelling and do not contain significant or substantial changes or annotations.

Creation of records

Records are created to preserve the corporate memory and historical information related to Defence events, activities, decisions and personnel. Records are required to be complete, reliable and fit for purpose enabling Defence to:

  1. meet operational, legal and legislative obligations
  2. provide accurate and adequate evidence of Defence functions, policies, procedures, decisions and transactions
  3. support lessons learnt and better decision-making in the future.

Capturing and describing records

Defence records are to be captured in systems that ensure they are adequately described, organised and preserved for as long as they need to be kept. When records are adequately described, users will have confidence in the integrity of the records and will be able to discover and retrieve records more readily.

Systems that hold records need to have an information structure that enables Defence personnel to store their records and find information when they need it. Information structures should be fit for purpose and organise records in a way that:

  1. uses recognisable and understood terminology
  2. enables Defence personnel to know where they need to store records
  3. enables Defence personnel to navigate to the records they need
  4. enables specialist records management activities including disposal.

Where possible, records must be captured in digital format to support the systematic and consistent application of records management practices. Physical processes should only be used to store records where digital systems are not available.[2]

Descriptive information in digital records (called metadata), can be used to identify, authenticate and contextualise records, making them easier to find, retrieve and use. Appropriate preservation techniques ensure the records remain accessible and usable for as long as required.

Accessing and disclosing RECORDS

Access to Defence records is to be managed in a way that ensures they are available when needed to conduct Defence business and are protected from unauthorised access when necessary.

Defence has an obligation under the Archives Act 1983, Freedom of Information Act 1982 and Privacy Act 1988, to enable public access to Defence records; however, the Archives Act 1983 provides some exemptions for Defence Intelligence agencies.

Defence security policy for the Classification and Protection of Official Information must be applied to Defence records, in accordance with the Defence Security Principles Framework. Access to records will only be restricted when required by Defence security policy, legislation or business requirements.

Where Defence holds personal information about an individual that was collected for a particular purpose, Defence must not use or disclose that information for another purpose. Prior to considering disclosing personal information about a young person or another individual, all other courses of action must be considered. This includes encouraging the young person or other individual to self-disclose the relevant personal information to the parents, a responsible third party or government oversight body.

Retention and disposal of records

The legal requirement to retain records is mandated by Commonwealth legislation. Defence records are to be disposed of when all legal requirements for the retention of records have been met, and when the records are no longer required for business or historical purposes. Records that are no longer required should be disposed of to enable the efficient and effective use of current records; and to reduce the cost of records management practices.

Key roles and Responsibilities

All Defence records are owned by the Department of Defence. The Secretary and the Chief of Defence Force are ultimately accountable for all Defence records although everyone has a responsibility towards Defence records.

Group Heads and Service Chiefs serve as the sponsor for records management within their Group or Service. They are responsible for ensuring that their respective Group or Service complies with the policy contained in the DRMP.

Functional Commanders and Division Heads are responsible for allocating adequate resources and approving local records management guidelines that meet business and functional requirements.

Records Management Advisors are responsible for providing specialist advice, leadership and coordination in relation to records management. They are required to:

  1. assist Group Heads and Service Chiefs, and the Functional Commanders and Division Heads to make records management related decisions
  2. develop local records management guidelines to meet business and functional requirements.
  3. The Records Management Advisor role must be identified on the employee’s performance agreement and the relevant specialised training must be completed.

Records Management Specialists are responsible for managing and maintaining the day-to-day records management activities including system administration and the provision of records management training. The Records Management Specialist role must also be identified on the employee’s performance agreement and the relevant specialised training must be completed.

Managers and supervisors are responsible for identifying where specialist records management resources are required and for ensuring that Records Management Specialists are given support to complete day-to-day records management activities.

All Defence personnel are responsible for following the approved local records management guidelines and completing training to understand their role and responsibilities.

ADF Cadets Records

A record in the ADF Cadets context is any artefact (physical or digital) that preserves the memory or knowledge of facts from which information can be obtained in relation to ADF Cadets events, activities, decisions, personnel and processes, regardless of format including:

  1. emails, documents, reports, assessments and forms
  2. presentations, plans and spreadsheets
  3. photographs, videos and graphics
  4. social media posts and images from websites.

Core Functions

The core functions and business activities associated with ADF Cadets programs which require appropriate records management processes include, but are not limited to:

  1. developing and implementing agreements policies, directives, strategies, procedures and other guidance material such as handbooks and manuals
  2. accepting and managing adult volunteers and youth
  3. planning, evaluating, approving and reporting on events and activities
  4. conducting risk assessments and managing risks
  5. delegating authority and approving actions
  6. providing and receiving advice
  7. receiving and handling complaints of unacceptable behaviour
  8. managing youth protection and safety incidents
  9. providing care or welfare services to youths
  10. conducting training for adult volunteers and youth
  11. undertaking compliance and monitoring functions
  12. conducting and facilitating audits
  13. liaison with other Cadet programs.

With regard to the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses into Child Sexual Abuse, appropriate records management processes must be undertaken by ADF Cadets programs in relation to:

  1. receiving and managing disclosures, allegations and complaints of child sexual abuse or neglect
  2. referring matters to other bodies (e.g. referrals to the Australian Federal Police)
  3. conducting investigations and inquiries into actual or alleged incidents of child sexual abuse or neglect
  4. collecting and managing supporting documents and other evidence
  5. conducting interviews with witnesses
  6. preparing investigation briefs
  7. imposing sanctions, penalties and disciplinary actions
  8. provide remedial action for individuals who have made allegations of child sexual abuse or neglect.

Full and accurate records about all incidents, responses and decisions affecting child safety and wellbeing, including child sexual abuse and neglect should be created, captured and maintained in accordance with the DRMP.

Capturing and describing ADF Cadets Records

ADF Cadets programs are required to create and retain evidence of their actions and decisions made on behalf of Defence. Such evidence must be managed as Defence records and captured in a Defence compliant information management system such as Objective, PMKeyS, the Defence Policing and Security Management System, Sentinel and/or CadetNet whenever possible. When capturing ADF Cadets records in Defence information management system such as CadetNet, care should be taken to ensure records are classified and described appropriately to assist with future access and retrieval.

Any Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS) with advanced recordkeeping functionality that enables the capture, description, and organisation of records, such as those used at school based Cadet units, is considered to be compliant with Defence requirements. Where practicable, all paper records should be digitised and captured on EDRMS of this nature.

In cases where it is not possible to capture ADF Cadets records in Defence compliant information management systems, ADF Cadets records should be:

  1. captured and maintained in suitable secured premises and containers
  2. monitored for environmental conditions appropriate to the record materials and retention periods.

Assessing and disclosing ADF Cadets Records

ADF Cadets records need to be available, accessible and retrievable whenever required for Defence business, or whenever individuals require access to records about themselves, as recognised by the Royal Commission. However, ADF Cadets records must also be protected from unauthorised access, tampering or alteration, and from accidental or intended damage or destruction.

Retention and disposal of ADF Cadets Records

Guidance on the retention and disposal of ADF Cadets records is contained in NAA Records Authority 2019/00457762 (Defence Youth and Cadets). This Records Authority sets out those records that need to be retained and transferred to the NAA as national archives, and specifies the minimum length of time that other temporary records need to be kept. It gives Defence members permission under the Archives Act 1983, for the destruction of the temporary records described, after the minimum retention period has expired.

Disposal of ADF Cadets records is to be undertaken by authorised Defence members only, and is to occur in a planned, systematic manner, to include records in all formats, in all business environments and in all types of information management systems.

Roles and responsibilities for ADF Cadet programs

All Groups and Services responsible for the management of Defence youth programs including ADF Cadets must ensure that appropriate arrangements are in place to enable the policies outlined in the DRMP to be implemented.

Head of Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD) is responsible for allocating adequate resources and approving local records management guidelines that meet business and functional requirements.

The Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) must ensure that respective ADF Cadets programs implement records management processes and procedures that are compliant with this policy.

Privacy

ADF Cadets records that contain personal information are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)


[1] NAA Records Authority 2019/00457762 (Defence Youth and Cadets).

[2] In 2011, the Australian Government released the Commonwealth ‘Digital Transition Policy’ which requires agencies to move to digital information and records management, and away from paper-based records management. This means that the majority of Defence’s records must be created, stored and managed digitally, and where practicable, paper records should also be digitised.

Chapter 4: ADF Cadets Information and Communication Technology

INTRODUCTION

The Australian Defence Force Cadets (ADF Cadets) requires capable Information and Communications Technology (ICT) solutions to support the timely, effective and efficient administration of the ADF Cadets programs - the Australian Navy Cadets (ANC), the Australian Army Cadets (AAC), and the Australian Air Force Cadets (AAFC).

The Joint Support Services Division (JSSD) within the Joint Capabilities Group is responsible for providing ICT hardware systems and services to over 550 ADF Cadets units across Australia. These systems are delivered via broadband internet services, hosted in an approved Defence environment, and include the ongoing development and sustainment of an online workflow management system known as the CadetNet Enterprise Application. CadetNet is an approved ADO Official system that provides ADF Cadets with the capacity to electronically manage and administer personnel, logistics, facilities, training and cadet activities.

POLICY INTENT

This policy outlines the minimum requirements associated with the design, provision, use and support of ICT systems, processes and equipment provided for the ADF Cadets.

POLICY PRACTICES AND MEASURES

Management and support of ICT systems

ICT systems provided for the ADF Cadets must be supported and managed effectively and possess appropriate security mechanisms. CadetNet is the primary information system for the ADF Cadets and is to be managed by JSSD.

JSSD is responsible to ensure that all ADF Cadets ICT systems:

  1. maintain appropriate system documentation, including disaster recovery and system guides
  2. maintain and administer relevant website domains
  3. are hosted in Defence approved data centres or in cloud based providers that are on the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) approved list
  4. employ contemporary industry standards for software versions and technology.

Security. JSSD is to ensure that the CadetNet information system maintains a current Chief Information Officer Group (CIOG) security accreditation at the security rating as assessed by CIOG. JSSD is to advise CIOG of relevant changes to the CadetNet system in accordance with the Information Security Manual (ISM).

Privacy. Privacy of information on ADF Cadets ICT systems including CadetNet is to be managed in accordance with the Defence Privacy Policy and Australian Privacy Principles.

End user support. Each of the ADF Cadets programs is responsible for assigning staff to action requests for assistance from ADF Cadets participants. This role may be assigned to Australian Public Service (APS) personnel, Australian Defence Force (ADF) members or ADF Cadets Adults, including Officer of Cadets (OOC) and Instructor of Cadets (IOC).

Coordination. JSSD is responsible for conducting regular meetings to coordinate effective management of ADF Cadets ICT systems as per the agreed ICT Governance Framework comprised of a Community of Practice, Operations Committee and Strategic Advisory Group. The Strategic Advisory Group will report to the Joint Cadet Executive Board (JCEB).

Development, testing and sustainment of ICT Systems

ADF Cadets ICT systems are to be developed, tested and sustained through a collaborative effort involving all stakeholders.

Development. Requests for development items will be logged by JSSD as per the service management process, with approvals and prioritisation of development items managed through the relevant committees as determined by the ICT Governance Framework.

Account management. Information systems are required to have standard operating procedures maintained, covering access control processes in accordance with the ISM.

Account Creation. All ADF Cadets participants including cadets, OOC, IOC, and Defence Approved Helpers (DAH) must have an account created in the CadetNet system. Individuals who have not been formally accepted into the ADF Cadets are not to be assigned an account unless approved by Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC) and the Director General Cadets – Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) or their delegate.

Sustainment. JSSD is responsible for coordinating the items included in each sustainment release which will be scheduled on a quarterly basis or as required.

Testing. Each ADF Cadets program must provide appropriate personnel to conduct regular user acceptance testing of new functionality or modules implemented in the system on a routine basis.

Standard Operating Procedures (SOP). JSSD is responsible for the development, management and maintenance of SOP that support the use of CadetNet.

ICT system internet connections

Provision of a Connection. ADF Cadets units are to be provided with Defence funded internet connectivity that is appropriate for the geographical region, local facilities and purpose of each unit. JSSD is responsible for maintaining and funding of the Defence contracts for this capability including the baseline equipment.

Types of Connections. JSSD is to provide a minimum of one internet connection to each ADF Cadets unit. This connection must be configured with appropriate content filtering mechanisms to ensure appropriate access for ADF Cadets business activities only.

ICT hardware use, stocktaking, support and disposal

All Defence owned ICT hardware issued to ADF Cadets units is to be used in accordance with the policy and directives issued by CIOG. This includes the initial hardware issue, nature of use, stocktake, repair and disposal through the asset’s lifecycle.

Stocktakes. The DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must ensure that an ICT Asset Register stocktake is conducted in CadetNet by the notified due date for every iteration of that process.

Refresh. JSSD coordinates refresh activity on the basis that no supported ‘in service’ ICT asset will be greater than 6 years of age within the ADF Cadets ICT environment. Costs associated with a refresh will be negotiated with CIOG and are subject to available funding.

Procurement. ADF Cadets participants, including DAH must not purchase ICT assets with Commonwealth (relevant) monies as described in the Public Governance and Performance Accountability Act 2013.

Management of ADF cadets website

All ADF Cadets related web sites (both internet and intranet) must be maintained in accordance with the Defence Web Estate Manual (WEBMAN) or the approved branding used by the relevant Service. JSSD is responsible for maintaining and updating web infrastructure and may assist with the administration of ADF Cadets web content, however the development and accuracy of content on the ADF Cadets web estate is the responsibility of the ADF Cadets programs. Web content must be approved by the appropriate level officer (or relevant rank / delegate) prior to being published.

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 5: Use of Social Media in ADF Cadets

INTRODUCTION

Social media is an integral part of society and an important form of communication, education and social interaction, particularly amongst youth. ADF Cadets has a responsibility to ensure ADF Cadets Youth are protected from abuse and sexual exploitation by the safe use of social media within ADF Cadets. Inappropriate use of social media presents a reputational risk for ADF Cadets Adults and Youth participants, the Services and their cadet programs and/or Defence.

Social media and online environments refer to technological devices and platforms including social network services.

POLICY INTENT

The intent of this policy is to outline the youth protection risks associated with the use of social media within the ADF Cadets environment to ensure ADF Cadets Youth are protected from abuse and sexual exploitation, and ADF Cadets Adults/Youth are equipped and informed with the knowledge and skills to use social media appropriately and in a youth safe manner.

This policy should be read in conjunction with Part 1 Section 6 Chapter 3.

Social Media Risks

Social media may be a vehicle for child exploitation through grooming or taking, sharing or posting sexualised photographs or videos of oneself or other people under the age of consent. Grooming is an offence regardless whether it is conducted in the physical or online environment. Taking, sharing or posting sexualised photographs or videos of oneself or other people under the age of consent is a crime under child pornography laws.

Cyber bullying refers to bullying through media such as mobile telephone text messages, emails, telephone calls, internet chat rooms, instant messaging, and social media networks to support deliberate, repeated and hostile online behaviour by an individual or group that is intended to harm others.

POLICY PRACTICES AND MEASURES

Grooming or taking, sharing or posting sexualised photographs or videos of cadets in the ADF Cadets organisation who are over the age of 18 but subject to special care provisions due to their participation in the ADF Cadets program is an offence subject to disciplinary and/or administrative action.

The use of ADF Cadets imagery must present cadets in a positive way that does not contain references to, or could be misinterpreted as tactical training or any of the other prohibited military like activities at Section 3 Chapter 2 Annex A.  Any imagery involving cadet handling of firearms/weapons should be vetted to ensure it complies with this requirement.

Cyber bullying is unacceptable behaviour which breaches the ADF Cadets Codes of Conduct and is not tolerated. Any participant who suffers from, or becomes aware of cyber bullying must report it immediately to their chain of command.

Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), and the Director General Cadets - Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) must ensure ADF Cadets Youth are protected from abuse and sexual exploitation through the safe use of social media in accordance with Part 1 Section 6 Chapter 3 and relevant Service Social Media policies.

Adult to Cadet Relations

Relationships between ADF Cadets Adults and Youth must remain professional at all times, including online relationships. ​ DGANCR, COMD AAC and DGCADETS-AF must ensure ADF Cadet Adults are aware of their responsibility to declare any personal relationship with a cadet on social media in accordance with Section 2 Chapter 2 and Part 1 Section 6 Chapter 3.

Reporting Unacceptable Behavior

Any instance of misconduct or misuse of social media must be reported immediately and investigated by the relevant Cadet organisation. ADF Cadets are to ensure any participant who has reasonable grounds to believe that there has been, or may have been, an incident of grooming, child pornography, child abuse or exploitation involving an ADF Cadets participant, must report the matter to State or Territory civil police, the relevant child protection authorities and their relevant cadet organisation chain of command in accordance with Part 1 Section 3 Chapter 3.

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

Chapter 6 : ADF Cadets Cadet Volunteer Payment

INTRODUCTION

Volunteerism is a core aspect of Australian communities; organisations such as Rural Fire Services and Surf Life Savers are deeply embedded into the psyche of Australian life. Similarly, the ADF is deeply embedded in the Australian identity as a respected national icon.  The ADF Cadets is a vital component of the ADF’s engagement with Australian communities and the participation of volunteers from communities is central to the relevance and success of ADF Cadets.  Cadet Volunteer Payment (CVP) is one component of the ADF’s suite of provisions to recognise this service.

POLICY INTENT

The intent of this policy is to provide the information and direction necessary for Service Chiefs to manage CVP in a consistent manner across all ADF Cadets programs.

AUTHORITY FOR PAYMENT

Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC) is the authority for payment of CVP. CJC exercises this authority through the issue of an instrument: Chief of Joint Capabilities (Approval of Payments to ADF Cadets)[1].

POLICY PRINCIPLES

CVP is based on the following policy principles:

  1. ‘One Cadet’ approach to the greatest extent possible with accommodation for Service unique application as required
  2. the volunteer status of Officer of Cadets (OOC)/Instructor of Cadets (IOC) as being central
  3. recognition of an OOC/IOC’s contribution with respect to experience, reimbursement and retention
  4. administrative sustainability and organisational affordability
  5. payment as a program enabler, rather than focused on individual entitlements that reflect an historical ADF remunerative outcome
  6. tiers are allocated by Services against the primary role of OOC/IOC
  7. payment is not remunerative in nature, application or perception
  8. payment is one enabling element of an OOC/IOC’s value proposition in support of the Defence/community partnership.
PURPOSE

CVP is an honorarium; a payment calculated as a daily amount provided in recognition of the unique contribution OOC/IOCs make to the ADF Cadets. Its purpose is to:

  1. reimburse OOC/IOCs for reasonable, out-of-pocket miscellaneous expenses associated with volunteering their time to participate in the ADF Cadets
  2. recognise the role that OOC/IOCs undertake in the ADF Cadets and any associated qualifications and training requirements
  3. incentivise continued participation in ADF Cadets and encourage OOC/IOCs to fulfil critical roles such as program delivery and executive command positions
  4. recognise acceptance of responsibilities and management of risk associated with youth.

CVP is a specific-to-purpose payment that is not linked to the ADF’s remuneration structures, hence it is tier based rather than rank based and is subject to its own periodic review cycle.

PAYMENT TIERS

CVP is a tiered payment. The tier rate of payment is not linked to rank, rather is reflective of a bracketed assessment of command, governance, assurance, risk, responsibility and anticipated cost levels being exercised or incurred by OOC/IOCs at each tier. A common base rate recognises generic volunteerism, and the incremental recognition of increasing responsibilities, risk and incurred costs recognises the demands of specific positions over rank. There is also a tier for OOC/IOCs undergoing training.

Each ADF Cadets program has its unique characteristics shaped by the culture of its parent Service and its organisational structure. The tier definitions are designed to allow Service Chiefs a level of flexibility when allocating tiers to their adult volunteer position establishment.  The tier definitions are as follows:

  1. Tier 1- Under Training: OOC/IOC trainees undertaking but having not yet completed mandatory training requirements for acceptance as OOC/IOCs. OOC/IOC trainees will be principally employed in support of program delivery at unit level and allows the Program to develop volunteer leadership and meet youth safety (supervisory) requirements.
  2. Tier 2 - Program Support: The administration and lower level development of the Program.  Program Support positions have very limited interaction with cadets and are focused on unit and regional level administration; governance and compliance checks; training development and the planning of activities.  They have an indirect role in youth safety.  Additionally, this tier may be applied to OOC/IOCs with a specialist skill critical to the effective support of the Program, such as, but not limited to, skills necessary in the development of policy and training programs.
  3. Tier 3 - Program Delivery: The direct interface with cadets. Program Delivery positions are focused on the delivery of training and other activities for cadets and have ‘first line’ responsibility for youth safety. Additionally, this tier may be applied to OOC/IOCs with a specialist skill critical for the effective delivery of the Program, such as, but not limited to regional chaplains and instructors[2].
  4. Tier 4 - Executive/Command: The management of the Program. Executive/Command positions have higher level responsibilities for youth safety through the development and delivery of the program, which may include policy development; governance and compliance; and representational duties.  Additionally, this tier may be applied to OOC/IOCs with a specialist skill deemed critical to the effective management of the program such as, but not limited to coordination chaplains, airworthiness or seaworthiness.
CONDITIONS FOR ELIGIBILITY

All OOC/IOCs are eligible for receipt of CVP at the tier rate designated for their primary role. CVP is not payable to Defence Approved Helpers[3].

OOC/IOCs may apply for the payment of a daily amount. Where a daily amount is not claimed there is a provision for OOC/IOCs to apply for reimbursement of an expense that has been, or will be, incurred in respect of participation in activities of the ADF Cadets.

APPROVAL OF PAYMENTS

CVP is routinely limited to 48 days per financial year for OOC/IOCs and claimable in half or full day increments. An OOC/IOC may apply for an allowance for more than 48 days of participation in activities of the ADF Cadets in a financial year if approved, in writing, by an authorised delegate, as defined in CJC Instrument: – Chief of Joint Capabilities (Approval of Payments to ADF Cadets).

The following Defence personnel may approve payments of CVP, in accordance with the amounts as authorised by CJC to OOC/IOCs in the ADF Cadets who have applied for payment of a daily amount or an expense that has been incurred in respect of participation in activities of the ADF Cadets.

  1. For 1 — 48 Days claimed:
    1. for Australian Navy Cadets: Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves, Director Australian Navy Cadets and National Flotilla Manager
    2. for Australian Army Cadets: Commander Australian Army Cadets, an Army Officer of the rank of Major or higher, or an APS Defence employee of the grade of APS6 or higher in the Headquarters Australian Army Cadets
    3. for Australian Air Force Cadets: Director General Cadets - Air Force, an Air Force Officer of the rank of Squadron Leader or higher, or an APS Defence employee of the grade of APS6 or higher in the Cadets Branch Air Force.
  2. For 49 — 150 Days claimed:
    1. for Australian Navy Cadets: Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves. Director Australian Navy Cadets
    2. for Australian Army Cadets: Commander Australian Army Cadets, Deputy Commander Australian Army Cadets
    3. for Australian Air Force Cadets: Director General Cadets - Air Force and Deputy Director General Cadets - Air Force
  3. For 151 - 200 Days claimed:
    1. for Australian Navy Cadets: Deputy Chief of Navy
    2. for Australian Army Cadets: Deputy Chief of Army
    3. for Australian Air Force Cadets: Deputy Chief of Air Force.
SUBMISSION OF CLAIMS

 An application must be made on or before the end of the calendar month that follows the calendar month in which the OOC/IOC participated in the ADF Cadets activities or incurred the expense relating to participating in the ADF Cadets activities.

LATE CLAIMS AND EXCEPTIONAL EXPENSES

For authorisation of late CVP claims submitted outside of the timelines at para 13 and for the authorisation of exceptional expenses (those expenses incurred by an OOC/IOC where there is no other source for reimbursing whole or part of that expense) the following are the authorised delegates:

  1. for Australian Navy Cadets: Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves and a member with the rank of Commander or higher (or Defence APS equivalent) in the Australian Navy Cadets Directorate
  2. for Australian Army Cadets: Commander Australian Army Cadets, an Army Officer of the rank of Lieutenant Colonel or higher, (or Defence APS equivalent) in the Headquarters Australian Army Cadets
  3. for Australian Air Force Cadets: Director General Cadets - Air Force and a member with the rank of Wing Commander or higher (or Defence APS equivalent) in the Cadets Branch - Air Force.
MULTIPLE ROLES AND TEMPORARY DUTY

Where an OOC/IOC is held against multiple roles on CadetNet the tier allocation is determined by their primary role.

Temporary duty is where an OOC/IOC is assigned duties that are different to their primary role; an example is a short period of deputising for a unit commander. Temporary is defined by the ‘non-permanent’ nature of this requirement, i.e. it is not subject to the reassignment of a primary role.  In these circumstances there is no provision within CVP to recognise temporary duty through the payment of a CVP at a tier rate different to the tier allocation of the OOC/IOC’s primary role. Delegates may consider the allocation of additional days (in excess of the 48 days) to compensate an OOC/IOC in these circumstances.

PAYMENT OF CVP AND/OR TRAVEL ALLOWANCE

CVP and Travel Allowance will normally be claimed separately and for specific reasons that align with the requirements for each payment. They may be claimed concurrently when OOC/IOCs are supporting specified ADF Cadet activities for which the delegate is satisfied that expenses likely to be incurred are considered unreasonable and when all other criteria for entitlement to the respective payments have been satisfied. Concurrent payment must be pre-approved by a delegate and can only be claimed for the day(s) of travel. Rates for travel allowance are provided at Annex A.

TAXATION

CVP is subject to taxation. The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) determined that Defence is required to continue to withhold an amount for taxation purposes from CVP payments.

SUPERANNUATION

CVP is subject to the Superannuation Guarantee Levy (SGL).

GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR APPLICATION

The guiding principles for the application of this policy are as follows:

  1. authority for payment of CVP is exercised through CJC
  2. CVP is funded by the Services; it is managed through Service Delegates within the affordability limits of each Service
  3. allocation of tiers is managed through the Service’s adult volunteer establishment for OOC and IOC positions against their primary roles.
REVIEW

CJC is the reviewing authority for CVP. The CVP policy and payment structure will be reviewed as dictated by service needs and evolving ADF Cadets’ requirements.

Related Documents

Chief of Joint Capabilities (Approval of Payments to ADF Cadets) 2020.

Annex:

  1. Rates for Travel Allowance (as at 01 July 2020)
Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)


[1] The CVP rates are provided in this instrument.

[2] This does not refer to IOC. It refers to specialist technical or environmental instructors, such as flying instructors and sailing instructors.

[3] Defence Approved Helpers are subject to appropriate screening regarding suitability for working with youth. DAH are untrained and unpaid volunteers.

Chapter 7 : ADF Cadets Management of Unit Funds

INTRODUCTION

The ADF Cadets are community based youth development programs run in partnership with the ADF. ADF support to cadet units includes funding and other resources. Individual units may raise money for unit related equipment and activities additional to those funded by the ADF.

Good financial management allows an organisation to operate efficiently, plan for the future and make the best possible use of available funds. It also protects the reputations of fund managers. As far as possible the funds management process should be transparent, flexible, and straightforward.

POLICY INTENT

The intent of this policy is to outline the nature of unit funds and support appropriate financial administration to maintain trust and confidence in ADF Cadets units, their fund managers and their parent Service.

POLICY

Unit funds are funds contributed by individuals that are used for the benefit of the unit for the conduct of unit social activities or provision of equipment and amenities to enhance the morale of the unit. They are not Commonwealth or public funds and are not managed by Defence or subject to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act.

Unit funds are not managed by Commonwealth Officials.

Although unit funds are not subject to Defence Financial management policies, there is a need for an appropriate level of command oversight in the management of unit funds to ensure management is in accordance with community expectations for the management of donated funds and conducted in accordance with the Defence Youth Safe Code of Conduct (Adult) and Defence’s Values.

Although unit funds are not managed by Commonwealth officials, there is a need to ensure unit funds are adequately managed and controlled. The Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves (DGANCR), the Commander Australian Army Cadets (COMD AAC), and the Director General Cadets – Air Force (DGCADETS-AF) should maintain appropriate command oversight of the management of unit funds according to the following principles:

  1. Management of unit funds matches community expectations for the management of donated funds.
    1. Keep finances secure.
    2. Establish and maintain strong financial controls.
    3. Meet all obligations under Commonwealth, State/Territory and/or local laws.
  2. ADF Cadets Adults must act lawfully and honestly and remain cognisant that:
    1. Responsible and transparent management of unit funds protects fund managers and the reputation of the ADF Cadets.
    2. Although unit funds are not Commonwealth or public funds, they are ADF Cadets program related. As such, Defence Approved Helpers (DAH), Instructors of Cadets (IOC) and Officers of Cadets (OOC) involved in the management of unit funds are expected to act in accordance with the standards of the Code of Conduct (Adult) and their respective Service values.
    3. ADF Cadets should guard against the threat of fraud and mismanagement of unit funds by ensuring ADF Cadets Adults are held to the standards of the Code of Conduct (Adult).

Privacy

Privacy matters relevant to this policy are to be managed in accordance with Part 1 Section 1 Chapter 2 and the Defence Privacy Policy.

Accountable Officer: Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC)
Policy Owner:

Head Joint Support Services Division (HJSSD)

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